How to Use Gelatin for Egg Replacement

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How to Use Gelatin as an Egg Replacement // deliciousobsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest

Many of my readers are following the autoimmune protocol (AIP), which requires elimination of eggs. There are also a number of you who cannot tolerate eggs at all, which makes certain recipes a no-go.

This post is for you!

I am able to tolerate eggs in small amounts. I tolerate raw eggs much better than cooked eggs. I can get away with eating homemade mayo throughout the week, but I can’t sit down and eat a big plate of eggs for breakfast.

UPDATE 2/1/16 – I am no longer able to tolerate eggs, even in small amounts, and even raw. I seem to still be reacting to them, which my antibody reactions getting worse over time, so for now (and maybe permanently), I have eliminated them 100% from my diet.

Needless to say, baking without eggs can be tricky, especially when there are so many delicious recipes out there I want to try!

The most common egg replacers are chia seeds and flax seeds. I wrote a detailed post awhile back on how to use chia and flax eggs for your egg-free baking. You can read that here.

But, for those who are on the AIP, or those who simply cannot tolerate seeds in any form, that creates a dilemma for egg replacement.

Enter the gelatin egg.

Gelatin is a great binder and I personally prefer it over flax and chia eggs. I find that it blends in much smoother and binds a lot better. Oh, and gelatin is SUPER good for you too, so that makes it win-win! If you’re not familiar with the health benefits of gelatin, then you MUST read this post on the Top 10 Health Benefits of Gelatin, plus 80 Ways to Eat More of It.

How to Make Your Gelatin “Egg”

Making a gelatin egg is SO easy and you’ll be amazed at how well it works as an egg replacement in certain recipes.

Important Note On Gelatin Types 

When it comes to gelatin, you don’t want any old gelatin off the supermarket shelves. You want to look for 100% grass-fed gelatin from healthy animals. Just like other animal products, quality is important.

That is why I recommend Vital Proteins Grass-Fed Gelatin products and Perfect Supplements products exclusively. I have compared these brand with other brands on the market and the quality far surpasses anything else I’ve tried. I am thrilled to be one of their affiliate partners and support such great products and companies.

Perfect Supplements offers a grass-fed hydrolyzed collagen (cold-soluble) right now and has a gelatin (hot-soluble) in the works for 2016. Read my review of their product here or watch the video below. You can order their own products via their own site here or on Amazon here.

Vital Proteins offers two types of gelatin. It is important to know that these ARE NOT interchangeable when it comes to recipes! The green top (Collagen Protein) is what you need for this recipe and for recipes where you are making gummies, “jello”, etc. The blue top (Collagen Peptides) is cold water soluble and does not thicken or gel like gelatin does. Both are very nutritious, but can’t be used interchangeably. You can order their own products via their own site here or on Amazon hereWatch this video:


How to Make One Gelatin "Egg"
 
Prep time
Total time
 
This recipe makes 1 "egg".
Author:
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Mix the gelatin and 1 tbsp. of warm water together until the gelatin is wet. It will be a bit fluffy looking.
  2. Pour 2 tbsp. of hot water over the mixture and whisk vigorously. You will see the gelatin start to dissolve and it will turn into a thick, sticky paste.
  3. Let the gelatin "egg" sit for a 2-3 minutes and then add to whatever you are making. Stir in until well combined and proceed as normal with the recipe.
  4. NOTE: Gelatin "eggs" will work well in recipes where 1-3 eggs are required. In recipes calling for more than 3 eggs, you may start running into issues. There are some things that real eggs provide to a recipe that simply cannot be replaced by flax, chia, or gelatin eggs. You can definitely experiment, but I cannot guarantee recipes with 4+ eggs will turn out properly with the gelatin egg.

Want EVEN MORE Info on Gelatin?

Then I simply have to recommend this book from my friend and affiliate partner, Sylvie of The Hollywood Homestead — The Gelatin Secret: The Surprising Superfood that Transforms Your Health and Beauty.

Sylvie dives into all of the benefits of gelatin, how it improves our health (especially bone, joint, brain, skin, dental, and gut health), plus she offers a ton of tasty recipes too!

Gelatin-Secret-ebook

 Learn More and Download Your Copy Here

 Want to learn more about gelatin and get even more recipes? Check out this post!

10 Health Benefits of Gelatin, plus 80 Ways to Eat More of It // deliciousobsessions.com #realfood #gelatin Follow Me on Pinterest

Here are some of my newest recipes using gelatin that are not included above:

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About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food wellness educator and the founder of the Delicious Obsessions website. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. She began helping her mother cook and bake around the age of three and she's been in the kitchen ever since, including working in a restaurant in her hometown for almost a decade, where she worked every position before finally becoming the lead chef. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

Discussion

34 comments

  1. Thank you Jessica! My son was recently diagnosed with allergy to egg, dairy and *yellow* corn. I LOVE your site! Bless you for taking time to share with us all.
    Q: Maybe I missed it. Is that recipe equal to 1 egg or can it be used to substitute 1 to 3 eggs?
    Q: use the RED or GREEN can of gelatin?
    Thank you again for all you do!

    reply 

    Tara
    Posted 08/12/14

    • Hi Tara – Thank you so much for the kind words! I really appreciate it! 🙂 The recipe is equal to one egg. I realized I had not made that clear, so I updated the recipe. Also, same with the gelatin type. It’s the red can, as the green can won’t gel like you need it. I also made a note of that! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 08/12/14

  2. I have been playing around with gelatin for eggs – this is very helpful! Are you using the orange container or green? I can’t tell from the links?

    reply 

    Renee Kohley
    Posted 08/12/14

    • Hi Renee! The red can. The green can won’t gel like you need it to. I updated the post with a note about that since I had forgotten to mention it. Thanks! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 08/12/14

  3. Just to be certain, the recipe is for the equivalent of 1 egg, correct? So if I need 2 or 3 eggs, I just double/triple it?

    reply 

    Tina Basinger
    Posted 08/12/14

    • Hi Tina! Yes! I realized I didn’t make that clear, so I have updated the recipe. 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 08/12/14

  4. I’m excited to try this. Will it work for coconut flour recipes? I have so much coconut flour and a child with an egg allergy.

    reply 

    Amy
    Posted 08/12/14

    • Hi Amy – It should work in any type of recipe that calls for 1-3 eggs. The only issue you may find is that most coconut flour recipes call for A LOT of eggs, so if there is more than 3, I would be hesitant to try it, as it may not turn out very well.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 08/14/14

  5. do you know of anyone trying a gelatin egg in bread machine sorghum bread?
    Some of us just have to have it all! 😉

    reply 

    Jo
    Posted 08/12/14

    • Hi Jo – I am not aware of anyone, but perhaps someone will stop by and chime in! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 08/14/14

  6. I’ve done this in a few recipes as well – love it! Pinned.

    reply 

    adrienne @ whole new mom
    Posted 08/13/14

  7. AH! Wondering if you could help me with some troubleshooting! I so desperately want this to work and every time I’ve tried it’s a big failure. I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong. I follow the instructions exactly, and upon first incorporating the “gelatin mix” (which is always a bit “gummy” but never “solid” and never “clumpy”) things seem to be going well and once I start mixing it in with the other ingredients, the gelatin completely forms into gel clumps all over the place and doesn’t incorporate at all. Any tips? I’d love for this to work!

    Thanks so, so much!!

    reply 

    Keira
    Posted 08/15/14

    • Hi Keira – You want to make sure that when you add the hot water that you whisk the gelatin until it is completely dissolved and smooth. Then add it to your other ingredients. I like to pour it in slowly with the mixer running and I never have any issues with it not incorporating properly. The only time I have had problems is when I don’t ensure the gelatin is completely dissolved.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 08/23/14

  8. Hi Jessica,
    I baked the answer to my own question.
    Using Karina’s Delicious Gluten-Free Bread. Recipe one egg equivalent was Ener-G as recommended, the second was a gelatin egg. Made a delicious loaf of bread tasted like toasted oats.

    reply 

    Jo
    Posted 08/24/14

  9. Hi!
    We have recently started an AIP diet and are trying to use gelatin in recipes but we find that the food turns out gummie and chewy. How do we prevent this or is that to be expected? We use vital proteins brand gelatin.

    Thanks,
    Michelle

    reply 

    Michelle
    Posted 02/07/15

    • Hi Michelle – What types of things are you using the gelatin in? When it comes to baked goods, I have never noticed them to be gummy or overly chewy. I’m curious what types of dishes you’ve used it in? I’ll have to pay close attention next time I bake something with gelatin and see if I notice the texture as being gummy.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/08/15

    • I tried this for the first time today as well. My pancakes turned out gummy and chewy as well. =( Hopefully I can figure out what happened.

      reply 

      Donna
      Posted 04/04/15

      • Hi Donna – How many eggs were you replacing? Sometimes I notice a slight change in texture if I’m replacing more than 3 eggs. If it’s just one or two, I don’t notice anything. It could be that I have been doing it for so long that I just don’t notice anymore! 🙂

        reply 

        Jessica Espinoza
        Posted 04/05/15

  10. can I use gelatin in gluten free bread instead of eggs?

    reply 

    Dalia
    Posted 03/15/15

    • Hi Dalia – Yes. I only bake gluten-free since I am allergic to gluten and the gelatin eggs work great in recipes calling for 1-3 eggs. Any more eggs than that and it won’t work as well. Happy baking!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 03/15/15

  11. If a recipe calls for 4 egg whites, how many gelatin eggs should I use? Thank you!!!

    reply 

    Katherine
    Posted 05/01/15

    • Hi Katherine – I’ve never used the gelatin eggs for recipes calling for just egg whites. I’ve only used it as a sub for whole eggs. I’ll have to add that to my list to try! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/03/15

    • For recipes requiring whipped egg whites you could certainly try using aquafaba (canned chickpea/garbanzo bean liquid.) Since aquafaba can be whipped and used to make meringes I’d be tempted to give it a go. It’s kind of fascinating. Check out aquafaba videos on YouTube.

      reply 

      Susan
      Posted 02/28/16

      • Hi Susan! Very interesting! I’ve never heard of that. I wrote this post about the gelatin egg primarily for the people who are following the Autoimmune Protocol. For those people, they would not be able to eat the product you mentioned as it’s made from legumes which are not allowed. It’s definitely good to know that there is something like this for the non-Autoimmune crowd though! Thanks for stopping by! 🙂

        reply 

        Jessica Espinoza
        Posted 02/28/16

  12. What is the difference between the color canisters? Why does one work and the other doesn’t? I have a different brand and just tried it and it didn’t work. The kind I have is hot and cold soluble. Would that be the difference?

    reply 

    Virginia
    Posted 08/10/15

    • Yes, one is cold soluble (meaning it won’t gel), the other is hot soluble and will gel. Watch the second video above. I explain it all there, as well as in the paragraph right above that! LMK if you have any other questions! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 08/12/15

  13. For bread it works perfect but for bar cookies I just got a gummy mess. I did meli it all the way. Could cool weather affect it?

    reply 

    Debbie
    Posted 01/29/16

    • Hi Debbie – I don’t think I have used it in bar cookies before. I do use it in breads and brownies and it works great. I will have to remember to try it in bar cookies next time I make some. I had reintroduced eggs for a little while but then started reacting to them again, so now I’m egg free once more! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 01/31/16

  14. I’ve been following these directions exactly for single serve mug cakes & muffins but have been having horrible results. I’ve only been using 1 gelatin egg but my muffins/cakes overflow out of the sides of the tin/mug and remain wet and gooey no matter how long I bake them for. They taste delicious but look like failed science experiments. Any advice? I want to try this in a nut flour pancake recipe but am afraid of the potential gooey mess that may make flipping the pancake impossible.

    reply 

    Kellie
    Posted 02/26/16

    • Hi Kellie – I personally have not tried it with any mug cake recipes or in pancakes. I’ll have to give that a go some time and see what transpires. 🙂 I have used it in cookies and brownies and it works great. This type of egg substitute does only work well in recipes that call for 1-3 eggs. Any more than that and it often won’t turn out as well. Hope that helps! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/28/16

  15. I have seen a recipe in which they mixed the gelatin powder in with the dry ingredients and water in with the wet, then combined as usual. This seems so much simpler! Maybe the gelatin would absorb water and set as it bakes? Have you tried it this way?

    reply 

    Heather
    Posted 04/14/16

    • Heather – Interesting! I have not tried it that way, though I have tried mixing it into my batter as a dry powder (without blending with water first) and it gets very clumpy. I’ll have to give your method a try and see what happens, though I would be concerned with clumps happening. Thanks for stopping by!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/18/16

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