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52 Weeks of Bad A** Bacteria – Week 29 – Lactofermented Garlic and Dill Carrots

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Lactofermented Garlic Dill Carrots Follow Me on Pinterest

For week 21, I shared my recipe for Dilly Carrots with you. That recipe was done in a regular Fido jar which resulted in a much better tasting ferment than I ever got with a Mason jar. I have since started using anaerobic fermenting vessels and recommend the ones from my affiliate partner, The Probiotic Jar. I have revised the original recipe for those types of jars. The main difference between my old recipe and my new recipe is that we no longer use whey and the brine is different.

These carrots are delicious. They are garlicky and tangy from the fermentation, a hint of dill, and not nearly as salty as my previous version. That’s because in the anaerobic jars, the brine is different and tends to be much less salty than the brine that we are all accustomed to from the Mason jar days. These carrots taste best when they are really cold. Kids love them, so I hear, so if you’ve got some picky eaters in the house, you might try this ferment on them and see if they like it!

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About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food nut, coconut everything enthusiast, avid reader and researcher, blossoming yogi, and animal lover. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

Discussion

13 comments

  1. I have a question. I just moved some brined cucumbers into a smaller jar in the refrigerator. Can I reheat the brine and reuse it? It seems plenty salty.

    reply 

    SJ Smith
    Posted 10/30/12

    • Hi SJ – I would recommend just using the brine in salad dressings, etc., rather than reusing it. You’ll also preserve the probiotic benefit that way, if they are Lactofermetned. Does that help? :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 01/09/13

  2. Can dried dill be used in place of fresh? And if so, any ideas how much dry dill equals ‘a bunch’ of fresh? :) Thank you!

    reply 

    Cyndi
    Posted 11/28/12

    • Hi Cyndi – I don’t recommend using dried dill, as it tends to float to the top and sometimes can get moldy. The reason I recommend the fresh is because you and pack it safely at the bottom so you don’t end up with any floaters. For ferments where you have a brine, you want to ensure that everything stays submerged below the brine, in order to prevent spoilage. Dried herbs are hard to keep contained! Hope that helps! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 11/29/12

  3. I just tried making these because I love pickles, and these are awesome! I love them!
    There is just one problem, I was trying to google some info on what other vegetables could be pickled, and found out that pickled veggies can cause cancer!
    I never knew this, I could eat a jar of pickles (or these carrots) by myself in one sitting! This stinks!

    reply 

    yvette
    Posted 02/03/13

    • Hi Yvette – Thanks for stopping by and I’m glad you enjoyed the recipe! I’m assuming you’re referring to this article, or one similar to it: http://www.newser.com/story/119965/so-do-pickles-really-cause-cancer.html? I have read that same article, but I really am not worried about it. Keep in mind that there is a big difference between vinegar pickling and lactofermenting. They are two completely different processes. Lactofermented foods are among some of the best foods you can eat, because they are full of beneficial yeasts, bacteria, vitamins, and minerals. We all live in a very toxic world, with nutritionally deficient foods, which leads to unhealthy guts. True health lies in the gut and lactofermented foods are one of the most important foods to eat in a real food, balanced diet. I personally do not worry about getting cancer from lactofermented foods, but that’s just my opinion. :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 02/03/13

      • Thanks Jessica, that makes me feel a little better, I don’t know if I could give up pickles, sour kraut etc. It does say that these studies are based on Asian cultures, who a lot of times replace the fresh vegetables with the pickles. My family always eats more fresh vegetables, so I think we’re ok… Thank you!

        reply 

        Yvette
        Posted 02/04/13

  4. I am assuming once your ferment is finished in the pickleit jar you can move it to a different clean jar for storage in the fridge? I do want to buy some but they are quite expensive so would not want to just use them for storage if I do not have to.

    reply 

    Anne-Marie
    Posted 02/17/13

    • Hi Anne-Marie – I don’t transfer jars, as that would disturb the ferment too much. I do switch lids though. The PI lids are interchangeable with regular Fido jar lids, so I just take off the PI lid and put on a solid Fido lid. Leave the ferment in the same jar though, at least to start. When you’ve used up a quarter or so of it, you can move it to a smaller jar. I have been told that you want to keep as little head space at the top as possible to extend the life of your ferment, but I am the first to admit that I always forget to do this! :) Does that help?

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 02/17/13

  5. Why can’t you use this receip in a mason jar?

    reply 

    Susan
    Posted 02/04/14

  6. i don’t have any fancy jars. what advice can you offer for doing this ferment in a regular pickle jar?

    reply 

    jen
    Posted 02/05/14

    • Hi Jen – I’ve never done this specific ferment in a Mason jar or regular jar, as I no longer advocate using them. They don’t allow for all of the proper stages of fermentation and the risk for mold is so high, something I can’t risk with my leaky gut. You could try making is just as the recipe states, but just use the jars you have.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/08/14

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