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52 Weeks of Bad A** Bacteria – Week 32 – Lactofermented Garlic

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How to make lactofermented garlic recipe Follow Me on Pinterest

When I started out on this lactofermentation journey this year, the very first ferment that I made was fermented garlic. It was so easy to do and the results were amazingly delicious. The cloves lost their heat and almost became buttery in texture. The flavors were strongly garlic, but they were more complex than just your normal clove of raw garlic. I was hooked and have kept a jar on hand at all times since. You can see that I’ve already eaten half of the jar above and I really need to make more!

The brine can be used in salad dressings for an amazing garlic kick. The cloves can be used just like you would fresh garlic. If they are kept in raw form, you’ll retain the probiotic goodness, but they add such amazing flavor to cooked dishes that I use them all the time. I highly recommend making these, if you haven’t already. Did I tell you I use them all the time? I’ve lost count of how much garlic I’ve eaten since the beginning of the year, but I think on average, I consume about a quart of lactofermented garlic per month. Yowzah! Surprised my husband still kisses me! ;)

Since my original recipe was made using the old Mason jar method, I figured it was time to update the recipe for the anaerobic jars that I have now switched to. I recommend the jar systems from my affiliate partner, The Probiotic Jar. For those of you who are now fermenting in these vessels, here’s how to do it.

First, a few tips:

  • Only use organic garlic for this — commercial garlic has most likely been sprayed to reduce or eliminate the risk of the heads sprouting.
  • Take your time with the skins, as not to damage the flesh of the garlic clove.
  • Do not cut off the root end.
  • Make sure you allow plenty of time for peeling. This can sometimes take awhile, but trust me, the work is worth it!

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About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food nut, coconut everything enthusiast, avid reader and researcher, blossoming yogi, and animal lover. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

Discussion

82 comments

  1. I was wondering why you say not to damage the garlic cloves? I did one jar where I peeled all the cloves by hand and 1 jar where I used the 10 second skin removal method. The jar where I used the 10 sec. method seemed to get “fizzier” within a day or so. I tried the garlic from both at 6 days but it was still real pungent. I was going to try it again tomorrow as that will be 10 days – I am using an airlock system. Love your posts and recipes! Thanks for sharing them!

    reply 

    Kris W.
    Posted 09/03/12

    • Hi Kris – Thanks for stopping by. I learned about the need to not damage the cloves on the Pickl-It website. Apparently, when there is damage to the cloves, it can set off a chain of chemical reactions that can actually destroy some of the nutrients in the garlic. Here is the page where they talk about that: http://www.pickl-it.com/blog/524/garlic-is-the-1-herb/. It goes into some pretty in-depth info, some of which, my eyes glazed over on! I used to use that 10 second method, but since I learned not to brush or cut into the cloves, I stopped. Now that you mention it, my garlic doesn’t get as fizzy as it used to. I don’t know if that is directly related, but it’s interesting. Thank you for your kind words!!! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 09/03/12

      • Thanks for the info – sounds like sound advice. I will try the water method you posted about next time. My garlic is still very pungent – it has been 11 days and when I tried it yesterday it was still like biting into raw garlic. Any ideas on how much longer I should let it go on the counter. The air lock seems to still be functioning (meaning the inner part is getting pushed to the top by the escaping gases).

        reply 

        Kris W.
        Posted 09/04/12

        • Kris – you want to leave it out on the counter until the active fermentation stops. You’ll know when that happens when there are no more bubbles being released in the jar. If you’re not sure, tap on the outside of the jar and look for any bubbles to go floating up to the top. Once that stops, you can move it to the fridge. The duration for active fermentation will vary, depending on the temp of your house. Mine took right at 7 days. My house runs warm, so yours might take longer if it’s cooler. The really nice flavor won’t start developing until about a month down the road from what I’ve experienced. The longer it ages, the better it tastes! :)

          reply 

          Jessica
          Posted 09/04/12

  2. Jessica,

    For the cold storage phase, do you change to a Fido lid or just keep it as is?

    I’ve never let garlic go that long. I need to get some started. :)

    Amanda

    reply 
    • Hi Amanda – When I am done with the initial ferment, I just switch out the Pickl-It lid with a regular Fido lid. They are interchangeable, and since I only have two PI jars, I try to free them up as quickly as possible! I need to start another batch ASAP, because I don’t have much left! Does that help?

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 09/03/12

      • That sounds good, Jessica. It would be easier to store them too without the air lock. I still ferment in lesser vessels when I’m not using a pottery crock, but this makes a PI strategy more reasonable.

        Amanda

        reply 
        • Yeah – I stock up on Fidos whenever I can find them and then just switch lids around. It definitely makes it much more cost effective! :)

          reply 

          Jessica
          Posted 09/04/12

  3. I noticed in the directions it says a 2% brine but in the ingredients you list a 3%. I just wanted to clarify rather than assume it is 3%. B/c we all know where that leads ;)

    reply 

    Jerian
    Posted 09/07/12

    • Whoops! Typo! It should be 3% brine. And yes, I know all to well where assumptions lead. heh heh :) Thanks for letting me know!

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 09/07/12

      • So a 3% brine in this case.. would not be 19 grams of salt per 4 cups of water then?

        In another fermented garlic recipe I’ve found, it says for a 3% salt bring you need 28.5 grams. Is that correct?

        Thanks in advance~

        reply 

        Dana
        Posted 01/15/13

        • Hi Dana – it’s a 2% brine for the garlic – 19 grams sale to 4 cups of water. Some recipes call for 3%, but I have asked 5 different fermenting experts and they all say 2%, which is why I went with that. Hope that helps! :)

          reply 

          Jessica
          Posted 01/15/13

          • SUPER helpful! Thanks so much (just bought garlic so perfect timing)!

            reply 

            Dana
            Posted 01/15/13

  4. Do you know if the fermenting stops you smelling of garlic? I LOVE garlic, but work close up with people so have to be careful how much I eat.

    reply 

    Melinda
    Posted 09/13/12

  5. Hi, interesting stuff! I’ve never done any of this before so Im not totally clear on a thing or two regarding the procedure. The brine; is that just the water and sugar? And what makes it “3%”.
    Also not sure about step 11. Sounds like theres some basic stuff that I need to first know before understanding all of this.

    Do you have another article for beginners on the whole fermenting game maybe?

    Thanks :)

    reply 

    Bob
    Posted 10/03/12

    • Hi Bob – Thanks for stopping by! Let’s see if I can answer each question:

      1. The brine is salt and water. You would never make a out of sugar for veggie ferments.

      2. The 3% brine is 28.5 grams of sea salt (by weight) to 4 cups of water (step 3 in the recipe). Having a kitchen scale is very handy for fermenting, because you will need different percentage brines for various ferments. I got mine at Bed Bath and Beyond for $10.

      3. For ferments that tend to have floaters, or pieces that rise to the top or above the brine, it’s a good idea to use a weight to hold everything down. Whenever food in a ferment peeks out of the brine, it (a) doesn’t end up fermenting correctly, and (b) lends itself to spoilage. You can buy glass weights for fermenting vessels, but I just used the lid of one of my .2L Fido jars and it works perfectly. I already had one, so I saved money!

      4. I don’t really have any beginner articles about fermenting. Mine are really all recipes that discuss the process within the post. For some good overviews of fermenting, how-tos, etc., I recommend the following resources:

      http://www.pickl-it.com/faq/fermenting/ – This FAQ section is awesome and is a great place for beginners to start!

      http://www.picklemetoo.com/articles-on-fermentation/

      http://www.cookingtf.com/category/foodmatters/lactofermentation/

      I think there is plenty of information in there to get you started! Does that help? :):)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 10/03/12

      • Perfect. Yes it does! :) Thanks a lot. Im gonna get started.

        reply 

        Bob
        Posted 10/10/12

  6. I love garlic and tried to ferment garlic on the counter. After 17 day…I noticed there’s a white film floating on top. The white film looks a lot like thin layer of fat solidified in meat broth. Since it’s just garlic fermented in 3% salt water I am wondering what caused the white layer. I live in Phoenix and room temp here is around 83 degree. Is safe to eat the garlic? Since it’s warm here… shall I ferment on the counter for 15 days instead of a month? Thank you again for the post & inspiration!

    reply 

    Pei
    Posted 10/03/12

    • Hi Pei – Thanks for stopping by! You know, I’m not sure what that film could be. It could be kahm yeast, but without seeing it, it’s hard to know. Since your house is warmer, things are going to ferment faster. The ideal room temperature for fermenting is between 68 and 72-degrees Fahrenheit. You could also do what I do during the summer and move your ferments to the basement (if you have one). The warmer the temp, the quicker things will ferment. I hope that helps! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 10/03/12

  7. This looks fabulous! I’m starting it as soon as I can acquire the Pickl-It device… given my insane love of all things garlic, this is a must! Thank you!

    reply 

    Dustin
    Posted 11/08/12

  8. When it’s done fermenting and ready for cold storage,can you remove the finished product to say, a mason jar and store it in the fridge that way so that you can keep using your fido/pickle it jars? BTW, I’ve just started fermenting and am happy to have some across your site; very informative and enlightening! I appreciate the fact the you present all sides and thoughts of fermenting and it’s various methods and procedures, i.e. mason jar vs. pickl-it/fido jars. I’m ordering some fido jars today and am thinking that they will be my main course of action for fermenting;)

    reply 

    Maggie Swaim
    Posted 12/05/12

    • Hi Maggie – Thank you for your kind words! I am so glad you found me! :) We’re all learning and not all at the same speed. I like to present the information as I see it and encourage everyone to make their own decisions! For your ferments, I would recommend keeping it in the same jar, but you can switch out the Pickl-It lids with the Fido lids. Whenever I have a ferment that is ready to go to the fridge, I put a clean Fido lid on the jar, so that I can keep my PI lid free. I only have 2 PIs, but a gazillion Fidos. Does that help? :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 12/05/12

  9. Hi Jessica. Could I use this recipe without a Pickl-It jar?

    reply 

    Dana
    Posted 01/09/13

    • Hi Dana – You could make it in a different type of jar, though I only recommend true anaerobic fermentation and for right now, the PI jar is the only thing that provides that, other than the Harsch crock. My reasoning for this is in this post here: http://www.deliciousobsessions.com/2012/05/52-weeks-of-bad-a-bacteria-week-18-fermenting-methods-weve-had-it-all-wrong. Happy fermenting! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 01/09/13

      • Thanks for the fast response Jessica!
        I always get confused with the percentage of brine/ how much salt to put in per liter. I will follow your instruction “(19 grams of salt per 4 cups of water)” – thanks so much. I was also confused about the two recipes (with and without Pickl-It) so I wanted to be sure!

        I’ve read all the articles imaginable about fermenting in various vessels and about the possible mold that can form when oxygen is in your vessel (spent almost 1/2 my day yesterday reading that!) and thanks again for your article. I’m taking Katz advice and will ferment with glass jars (Fido, if I can find them here in France… If not, I’m not going to worry about it), making sure veggies are covered in brine (and scraping off any mold on the top, if there is any). I want to be able to open the jars and test the flavor since I’ve never fermented (other than kimchi, which I’ve been doing for 2 years- in a plastic container! I’m still alive and kicking).

        I hope to try the airlock way as well; that will be my upcoming DIY project for 2013 (I’m not spending money I don’t have buying Pickle-It stuff and getting it shipped to France when it’s so easy to make myself). I have read comments saying the DYI isn’t not 100% safe and I simply don’t agree (just stating this bc I have a feeling that comment was coming! I agree on the point that it won’t be 100% germ free if it’s not air locked with the best possible engineered system, like Pickl-It. I just don’t agree on being a germaphobe).

        Sorry for the long comment!

        reply 

        Dana
        Posted 01/10/13

        • Hi Dana – Thanks for swinging back by! :) The brine percentages are always hard for me to remember. They do vary for certain things, depending on what you’re fermenting. They have their brochure on their site in PDF format. Here is the link: http://www.pickl-it.com/faq/howto/#faq_492. There are 3 salt brine formulas. You know, we are all learning and we have to do the best we can with what we have. Keep me posted on your journey! :)

          reply 

          Jessica
          Posted 01/10/13

          • Thanks again Jessica for all of the help and the uber-fast responses!

            I checked out the link (very nice FAQ, thanks!) but cannot find the 3 salt brine formulas. :-\

            reply 

            Dana
            Posted 01/15/13

            • Hi – Dana – you will need to download the PDF from that link (http://www.pickl-it.com/faq/howto/#faq_492), where it says “Pickl-It Instruction Bundle”, there are two links: “Pickl-It Brochure – Front & Back Cover” and “Pickl-It Brochure – Inside two pages”. These PDFs will have the sale brine formulas in them. Does that help?

              reply 

              Jessica
              Posted 01/15/13

  10. wonder is your garlic as healthy as black garlic
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_garlic_(food)

    reply 

    star stern
    Posted 01/19/13

    • Star – My lactofermented garlic is going to be very different than black garlic. Black garlic is fermented at very high heat. Because of the high heat, you lose a lot of the probiotic benefit. They are both going to have the nutritional properties of garlic, but my LF garlic will also be teeming with beneficial bacteria that black garlic would not have. Hope this helps! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 01/20/13

  11. Have you had any experience with the garlic cloves turning blue???
    Or did I do something wrong????

    reply 

    Matt
    Posted 01/28/13

    • Hi Matt – Nope, you did nothing wrong! I have had that happen and from what I have found through research, this happens when compounds in the garlic react with certain minerals in your water. Copper tends to be one that will cause a bluish greenish color in the cloves. There’s nothing wrong with them and they’re fine to eat. :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 01/28/13

  12. Smurf Garlic! Cool!

    reply 

    Matt
    Posted 01/29/13

    • HAHAHAHAHAHA! Awesome! Thanks for the chuckle! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 01/29/13

  13. I’m now on Day 29 fermenting garlic. I still find it has a very strong taste. There are a few bubbles when I tap/move the jar. Does this mean that it needs to sit longer. Thanks.

    reply 

    Sue
    Posted 02/17/13

    • Hi Sue – The garlic will continue to mellow as it ages. It also depends on the batch. I find that sometimes I get some really fiery cloves and other times the garlic is more mild from the start. If there are still lots of bubbles, I’d let it go a few days longer, but if there are just a few, then I’d say it’s fine to move to the fridge. If you can let it go for the full three months, it will mellow in flavor a lot more. And don’t forget to use the brine in salad dressings. It’s amazing! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 02/17/13

  14. Hi,
    Blue-ish garlic are fine to eat, yer most of my friends find them unappealing to say the least.
    Any trick on how to avoid that please?
    Thanks!
    A.

    reply 

    adrien
    Posted 03/11/13

    • Hi Adrien – The blue green tinge comes from minerals in the water. You could try using distilled water, but I prefer not to, just because I don’t like that it is devoid of minerals, though, if you’re using a high-quality sea salt, that will ensure there are some minerals in there. I use filtered water from my Berkey and I have not had a problem with the discoloration since that switch. I do see why some people would be a little freaked out about it though! :) Let me know how it goes if you use the distilled.

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 03/12/13

      • Hi Jessica,
        I did not want to use distilled water so I used filtered water. The garlic does not seem to turn greenish. Yet there seems to be a kind of molt slightly developping on top. I removed it with a spoon. Yet I wondr if it is time to stop… ANyway, how do I know my garlic is ready?
        Thanks!!

        reply 

        adrien
        Posted 03/26/13

        • Hi Adrien – I am not sure about the mold on the top of the ferment. I’ve never had that happen with my garlic. I normally do not eat ferments that have gotten moldy, as the mold spores spread throughout the ferment and will still remain, even after you’ve scraped off a layer. Fermented garlic needs to go one month at room temperature and then two months in the fridge. You can start using the garlic after the first month, but I find the flavor is much better after the three months. Hope that helps. :)

          reply 

          Jessica
          Posted 03/26/13

          • Hi,
            Why do you think caused the molds? Maybe it is because I have been manipulating kefir and kombucha… Anyway I threw away the garlic!
            Better luck next time I hope!
            Thanks!!!

            reply 

            adrien
            Posted 03/26/13

            • Hi Adrien – Not sure what caused the molds. It is possible that it may have gotten cross contaminated with another ferment. I have been told that you should keep your kombucha separate from other ferments, though it depends on how much space you have in your kitchen/house. As long as you practice good sanitary practices when preparing ferments, mold is typically not very common. But, sadly, it does rear its head sometimes. Such a bummer about that garlic! I am so sorry — I hate throwing food away :(

              reply 

              Jessica
              Posted 03/27/13

  15. A couple of brine questions. I have never fermented before and want to make sure I’m doing it correctly before screwing up! First, what kind of salt is recommended for a brine, can I use kosher salt? Secondly, when making the brine, do you heat the water to make sure that all of the salt dissolves properly? Thanks!

    reply 

    Katie
    Posted 03/17/13

    • Hi Katie – Sorry for the delay in responding. The salt that is recommended is the pink Himalayan salt. My friend Lisa just wrote a really great post about this: http://lisascounterculture.com/reviews-tips/stalk-your-salt. I do not recommend kosher salt. Yes, I dissolve my salt in hot water and then let it cool to room temp before adding it to the ferment. Have fun! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 03/21/13

  16. I have a couple questions since this is my first time making anything fermented the right way! The first question I have is that when making the brine do you heat the water up so that all of the salt melts, and then wait for it to cool? Or do you just mix the salt in with cold water.

    My second question is that I have read other comments with people saying they open the jar after 10 days or so, does this stop the fermentation process? Are you supposed to keep the jar shut for the full 3 months? And when you move the jar from the counter to the fridge, do you remove the airlock?

    Thanks so much for your help and your wonderful posts!
    Katie

    reply 

    Katie
    Posted 03/22/13

    • Hi Katie – Thanks for stopping by. I mix my salt with hot water until dissolved and then let it cool to room temperature before starting my ferment. It is recommended that you keep the jar closed for the full month that the initial ferment requires. This will help keep oxygen from entering the jar. I personally prefer to let the garlic go for the full three months before using, because I find the taste is much better at three months than one month. But, you can certainly start using after the first month. Do the initial ferment (1 month) at room temp, and then move to cold storage for the other (2 months). When I move the jar to cold storage, I remove the airlock and use one of the little pluggers to seal off the hole in the lid. Does that help? :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 03/22/13

  17. I tried making fermented garlic back in November and then I forgot about it. It has been sitting in a Pickl-It jar since then, not in the fridge. Is it still ok to eat? I’ve been afraid to try. If it was bad, how would I know? Thanks

    reply 

    Danielle
    Posted 04/03/13

    • Hi Danielle – I am not sure. I honestly can’t way one way or the other. If there is any signs of mold, discoloration, changes in texture, smell, etc. I would toss it. I’d personally be hesitant to eat it at this point. Just my gut feeling.

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 04/03/13

  18. Jessica,

    In Russia, the recipe for the similar dish is to mix vinegar, salt, home made spice mixture made of different dried herbs, and water, and boil it. The garlic would also be boiled in slat water (separate from the mixture) for about 10 minutes. After the garlic is cooled off, it is put in plain glass jar, and is covered with the cooled off liquid. The garlic would be ready to be used in about 4 to 5 days. The difference between your recipe and what I am used to is that you don’t use any boiling of any kind. I am wondering if the boiling aspect affects the enzymes, and the fermentation isn’t the same high level? What are your thoughts?

    reply 

    Olechka
    Posted 05/31/13

    • Hi Olechka – Thanks for stopping by! This is interesting. I imagine that you would lose a lot of the beneficial bacteria and yeasts (and enzymes) in the garlic by cooking them first. Whenever you’re fermenting, you want your food to be alive and fresh as possible. All fruits and veggies come with their own “native” bacteria on and in them, which is what helps cultivate the wide range of probiotics found in ferments. This is also why I don’t use a ferment starter (like whey) anymore. While the end product is probably delicious, it’s going to be lacking much of the probiotic benefit of fermenting the 100% raw cloves. Does that help at all? :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 06/02/13

    • hi there Olechka !!

      Your recipe sounds soooo delicious, would you mind sharing ?? :)

      thanks to you and Jessica !!

      reply 

      antonia
      Posted 10/14/13

      • Thanks for stopping by Antonia! :)

        reply 

        Jessica
        Posted 10/14/13

  19. How do you store the jars after fermentation is complete? Can you switch the lid over to a mason jar lid without risk of explosion? I am just thinking I don’t want to utilize my expensive lid when the need for it is over.

    reply 

    Michelle
    Posted 09/17/13

    • Hi Michelle – I have both Fido jars and the Pickl-It jars, so when I’m done fermenting, I remove the Pickl-It lid and switch it out for a Fido lid. They are interchangeable. I don’t recommend fermenting, or storing ferments, in Mason jars at all. Hope that helps! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 09/17/13

  20. Hello

    Thanks for information. I do have a question. Other recipes I have red call for whey or kefir grains. Any idea why this is?

    Thanks!
    Heather

    reply 

    Heather
    Posted 12/28/13

  21. Thank you so much for sharing this, my first batch came out perfect. I started my second batch and after about 3 weeks I noticed that my garlic is turning green, I don’t know what I did differently, is it now bad????? Thank you!!!! Happy New Year

    reply 

    Lynn C
    Posted 01/02/14

    • Hi Lynn – You did nothing wrong and it’s not bad. It is actually some of the compounds in the garlic reacting with minerals in the water (usually copper). Still totally edible! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 01/03/14

      • Thank you so much Jessica!!!! My first batch will be ready in about 2 weeks and I am so excited to try it. Thank you for sharing all your wonderful recipes! Happy New Year!

        reply 

        Lynn
        Posted 01/06/14

        • Hi Lynn – I hope you love it as much as I do! Happy new year to you as well! :)

          reply 

          Jessica Espinoza
          Posted 01/06/14

  22. Newbie to fermenting here. What about fermenting with PI, then storing in a Fido jar & lid? I’m about to start the Body Ecology Diet to heal my gut. I want to get a head start on fermenting foods. I ‘m hoping that if I have a variety of fermented foods on hand, BED will go a little easier. I’m searching out supplies (I have none) and trying to balance the cost of materials with safety and efficacy. Your input would be greatly appreciated.

    I’ve just barely started digging into your site, but I think we are kindred spirits. :) I have hypothyroid, adrenal fatigue (my cortisol crashes to 1.6 at noon), numerous food allergies/sensitivities & leaky gut. I am grateful for the research you have shared and your wonderful recipes. I have neither the concentration nor the energy to reinvent the wheel & I appreciate you path you have cleared. Peace, Joy and Love to you and yours in 2014.

    reply 

    Tina
    Posted 01/12/14

    • Hi Tina – That is what I do, except, I don’t actually switch out the jars, I just switch out the lids since they are interchangeable between the PI and the Fidos. Switching out the whole jar would introduce too much oxygen, so it’s better to leave the jar alone and just switch the lids. Hope that helps regarding that. I’m also happy to hear that the info on the site is helpful for you! So many people out there are in pretty much the same position as you and I (and many don’t know it). Healing your gut is the first step in healing everything else! Once that is done, it is much easier to get everything else under control. Make sure you are also paying close attention to your blood sugar, in addition to your adrenal and thyroid health, as they all three go hand in hand. Most people have blood sugar dysregulation if they have thyroid and adrenal issues. Hope that helps! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 01/12/14

      • Thank you, Jessica. Just to be sure…I can ferment in a Fido jar with a PI lid?
        I read your posts regarding blood sugar and found them informative, thank you.

        reply 

        Tina
        Posted 01/12/14

        • Yep! They are totally interchangeable. What I did to save a little money was buy a few of the smallest PI jars (for the lids) and then I stocked up on Fido jars since they are so much cheaper and then just mix and match as I need. Also, it makes it easy to take off the PI lid and toss on a Fido lid when the ferment is ready to go int he fridge. This keeps my PI lids open for more ferments. :)

          reply 

          Jessica Espinoza
          Posted 01/13/14

  23. Ok I’m officially blowing off trying fermentation now… those pickle it bottles are just too pricey. I really need the gut healing, but I don’t want to potentially make things worse using a Mason jar. :(

    reply 

    Becky L
    Posted 01/17/14

    • Hi Becky – I say start with what you have and can afford and then upgrade your tools as you can afford them. Don’t get overwhelmed and just have fun!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 01/21/14

  24. Hi I made fermented cauliflower 2 days ago in a mason jar. I put a few spices and fresh crushed garlic inside. I checked on it today and at the bottom of the jar there is a light blue color. I cannot tell if this is mold or if the garlic just turned blue. Sometimes when I cook with garlic and lemon the garlic turns blue/green from the acid. How can I tell if it is okay or not?! I noticed that there is a sour smell to it too (without even opening the had I could smell it) is this because I used a lacto fermented culture starter?

    reply 

    Renee
    Posted 02/01/14

    • Hi Renee – It is most likely the garlic that has reacted with the minerals in your water (most often copper). When that happens, the garlic can turn a blue green color. Totally safe to eat though. I’m not sure about the sour smell. It could be because if the starter. :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/03/14

  25. Thanks for this recipe! I was inspired to make a big jar of fermented garlic along with homemade pickles and sauerkrraut. Everything else turned out great, but my garlic batch turned pink. I know you mentioned that blue and green is OK, but I am not sure if I did something wrong if it turned pink :( I added dried oregano for flavor. Not sure if that ruined it. or if I put too much salt? Has this ever happened to you or another reader?

    reply 

    Leeann
    Posted 02/09/14

    • Hi Leeann – Thanks for stopping by! I have never experienced a pink batch. That is odd. Are you on Facebook? If so, I highly recommend this group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/CounterCultures/. It’s run by several fermenting experts. They should be able to tell you what may have happened. I really don’t know! :(

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/09/14

      • Thanks Jessica for your response! Yea, I have no idea what happened. All the liquid inside is pinkish, maybe almost purple but I was afraid it went bad. I’ll check out that facebook group you mentioned. Thanks a lot!

        reply 

        Leeann
        Posted 02/10/14

        • Hopefully the can assist. I would hate to see a whole batch tossed. It would make me sad. :( If you do find out what it is or what caused it, I’d love to know!

          reply 

          Jessica Espinoza
          Posted 02/12/14

  26. My garlic ferment is not quite a week old and my kitchen smells like garlic. Is it supposed to smell like that? My other ferments don’t. I had to move it to the basement because I couldn’t take the smell anymore. Not sure if it’s too cool there. Tell me what you think. Thanks!!!

    reply 

    Nancy
    Posted 03/03/14

    • Hi Nancy – Yes, the garlic can get a bit potent during its initial fermenting. What temp do you think your basement is at? Even if it’s a little on the cool side, it should be OK. It just might take longer to ferment.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 03/07/14

  27. Bizarre question… have you noticed less mosquito bites since eating fermented garlic regularly?

    I have been told to eat raw garlic regularly leading up/during summer to make myself more skeeter-repellant. Wondering if the fermentation would make this theoretical home remedy more effective. (I am major skeeter bait and hate using the strong sprays, but I have found nothing else that works and I love being outdoors but hate looking like I have leprosy)

    reply 

    HikingDiva
    Posted 09/14/14

    • I personally have not noticed a change, but I don’t spend time outdoors during the high mosquito times (dawn and dusk), so I can’t really say for sure. I do know that garlic has long been used for mosquito repellent. I’d be interested to hear if you think it works for you!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 09/14/14

  28. So excited to make this! How long can you use it once it is opened and in the fridge? I’ve heard sauerkraut is a month, would it be the same?

    reply 
    • Hi Candace! Yep! It will stay good pretty much indefinitely. I have a batch in my fridge that is over a year old and it’s still delicious. The flavor gets better with time. Have fun, I know you’ll love it! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 11/09/14

  29. I crated this using just a hermetically sealed jar. I didn’t notice that the probiotic jars have that additional plunger/air vent (?) piece. Will they still turn out (and be safe to eat) or did I waste an entire batch of garlic? :/

    reply 

    Sarah
    Posted 11/24/14

    • Hi Sarah – I think they should be just fine. I have fermented foods in the hermetically sealed jars before. You just have to use caution that it doesn’t build up too much pressure. That is why the probiotic jars that I use have the hole in the top for the airlock. I have always been told to go by smell. If the ferment smells bad or “off”, then it’s best not to consume. I think in the case of garlic, it’s a pretty forgiving ferment, so you should be good! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 11/25/14

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