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How to make lactofermented garlic recipe

When I started out on this lactofermentation journey this year, the very first ferment that I made was fermented garlic. It was so easy to do and the results were amazingly delicious. The cloves lost their heat and almost became buttery in texture. The flavors were strongly garlic, but they were more complex than just your normal clove of raw garlic. I was hooked and have kept a jar on hand at all times since. You can see that I've already eaten half of the jar above and I really need to make more!

The brine can be used in salad dressings for an amazing garlic kick. The cloves can be used just like you would fresh garlic. If they are kept in raw form, you'll retain the probiotic goodness, but they add such amazing flavor to cooked dishes that I use them all the time. I highly recommend making these, if you haven't already. Did I tell you I use them all the time? I've lost count of how much garlic I've eaten since the beginning of the year, but I think on average, I consume about a quart of lactofermented garlic per month. Yowzah! Surprised my husband still kisses me! 😉

Since my original recipe was made using the old Mason jar method, I figured it was time to update the recipe for the anaerobic jars that I have now switched to. I recommend the jar systems from my affiliate partner, The Probiotic Jar. For those of you who are now fermenting in these vessels, here's how to do it.

First, a few tips:

  • Only use organic garlic for this — commercial garlic has most likely been sprayed to reduce or eliminate the risk of the heads sprouting.
  • Take your time with the skins, as not to damage the flesh of the garlic clove.
  • Do not cut off the root end.
  • Make sure you allow plenty of time for peeling. This can sometimes take awhile, but trust me, the work is worth it!

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