52 Weeks of Bad A** Bacteria – Week 35 – Fermented Thai Basil “Pesto” Recipe

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Lactofermented Thai Basil Pesto Follow Me on Pinterest

This recipe for lactofermented Thai basil “pesto” is so delicious! The first time I made this was the first time I’ve ever fermented anything other than your standard veggie and brine ferment, so I have to admit, I was a bit nervous. I cannot take credit for the concept of fermented pesto, as I first became acquainted with it on my friend Melanie’s site, Pickle Me Too. She has a recipe for “Mexican Cilantro Pesto” that this recipe is based off of. If you have never visited Pickle Me Too, I highly recommend doing so! Melanie’s site is my go-to resource when I need some fermenting inspiration. She has so many awesome recipes!

I love basil, but I really, really love Thai basil. Thai basil has a mild, sweet basil undertone, but also has an anise/pepperminty flavor. It is used often in Southeast Asian cooking, so if you have ever eaten at a Thai or Vietnamese restaurant, then you have probably had this type of basil. I love Phở (Vietnamese noodle soup) and Thai basil is a traditional garnish for the soup. It is almost impossible to find at your normal grocery store or health food store. If you do, it is typically ridiculously expensive. I was at my local Asian market recently and was browsing their produce section to see what sorts of unique fruits and veggies they had. I stumbled across their herb section and was immediately in heaven. Their Thai basil (and regular sweet basil) is so reasonably priced at $4.00 a pound. So, I grabbed a pound of it and brought it home, craving pesto the whole way. A pound of basil is A LOT of basil! If you can’t find Thai basil in your area, you can substitute regular sweet basil and it will be equally delicious. This Thai basil pesto is now a staple in my fridge. Both pine nuts and walnuts are delicious in it.

Fresh Thai Basil Follow Me on Pinterest

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About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food wellness educator and the founder of the Delicious Obsessions website. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. She began helping her mother cook and bake around the age of three and she's been in the kitchen ever since, including working in a restaurant in her hometown for almost a decade, where she worked every position before finally becoming the lead chef. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

Discussion

8 comments

  1. I’m guessing I can leave the nuts out and not impact the fermenting right? Also I’ve never fermented anything yet so haven’t bought special jars yet. Will it work in a glass jar with typical metal lid? Thanks! Excited to try this

    reply 

    KC
    Posted 12/03/12

    • Hi KC – Yes, you can leave the nuts out and it would be fine. I don’t recommend fermenting in mason jars (or anything other than a Pickl-It jar) because they do not allow you to create a truly anaerobic environment, which limits the amount of LABs (lactic acid bacteria) that develop, and it also has a a much higher risk of spoilage. Proper LAB development is what is so important for healing the gut and building a strong immune system. Thanks for stopping by – I hope you enjoy the recipe. I can’t get enough of it! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 12/03/12

  2. Hi Jessica. How long will this last in the refrigerator? I’m very tempted to try it, but it’s something we would go through very fast, at least not to start.

    reply 

    Deborah
    Posted 01/18/13

    • Hi Deborah – It took me almost 2 months to go through my last batch and it was still fine. The top did start getting brown though, but I just skimmed that off and underneath was bright green. You could always cut the recipe in half too if you wanted to try less to start. 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 01/19/13

  3. Genius! This is on my make asap list! Sharing on my facebook page!

    reply 
    • Thanks Candace! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 12/01/13

  4. Is this 12 ounces by weight ?

    reply 

    Tamara
    Posted 07/20/15

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