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Homemade Coconut Avocado Oil Mayo Recipe | www.deliciousobsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest

Homemade mayonnaise.

When you perfect the recipe and technique, it’s amazingly delicious. However, the process of trial and error to get to that point often leaves a bit to be desired, at least in my experience! 🙂

I have a confession to make.

Kraft Mayo is, and forever will be, my standard of what mayo should taste like. While I don’t eat it anymore, due to the nasty, rancid, GM ingredients, it will forever be my standard. My homemade mayo will never taste like Kraft, and I have made peace with that, despite countless attempts to recreate it. However, my homemade mayo is just as delicious in its own special, healthy way. And, now that I have a recipe I am happy with and have learned the proper technique to make it, I am pleased to keep it real in my kitchen.

Did I mention the countless batches of mayo I made that either didn’t emulsify, broke, or otherwise tasted nasty? I finally got a combination of oils and spices that I like and wanted to share the recipe with you. I make this regularly, as long as I have a supply of fresh, pastured eggs from a source I trust (my parents). Everyone’s taste is going to vary, so what I consider delicious mayo might not be what you consider delicious. However, in an effort to keep rancid oils and GMOs out of our kitchens, it’s worth a try!

I have made mayonnaise with all sorts of different oils. I have experimented with different varieties of olive oils. Honestly, I have never liked the taste of olive oil, even when it’s not in mayo. I can eat it mixed into salad dressings, but the overall flavor of olive oil is not my favorite. I even tried (many times) making it with the olive oil from Chaffin Family Orchards, which I was told was the BEST for making mayo. Even though their olive oil is delicious (and that’s coming from someone who doesn’t really like EVOO), it was still too strong of an olive oil taste for me.

I also experimented with different coconut oils, various nut and seed oils, and combinations of all of the above. Some of them tasted good, some, not so much. I finally settled on a combination of expeller-pressed coconut oil (affiliate link) and avocado oil. This will give you the best, neutral-tasting mayo (in my opinion). I sometimes add a little macadamia nut oil in to the mix, which yields a very rich, buttery, flavored mayo.

On a side note, I really don’t venture out into the various nut and see oils too much, as they tend to be high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs / Omega 6’s), which lead to inflammation in the body if we get too much. There is a fine balance between Omega 3’s, 6’s, and 9’s and most vegetable, nut, and seed oils can easily throw that balance out of whack. However, in my quest to find the perfect oil combination for homemade mayonnaise, I stumbled across this great post from Mark’s Daily Apple, and was introduced to avocado and macadamia nut oils. Avocado oil has a fatty acid profile that is similar to olive oil and has a wonderful, neutral flavor. Macadamia nut oil is high in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) and low in PUFAs, so it is a much better choice than most nut oils. It has a very smooth, rich, buttery taste. Both, I found out, make delicious mayo. Both are relatively expensive though, so in order to keep the costs down, I decided to add in the expeller-pressed coconut oil (affiliate link) and my recipe was born!

I use an immersion blender to make my mayo. I have also made it in a blender and in a food processor. I do prefer the immersion blender, because it requires the least amount of clean-up and saves me some dishes. I use a wide-mouthed, pint Mason jar that I found at the thrift store. It is the perfect size. If you don’t like, or don’t have macadamia nut or avocado oil, then you could sub that for any other oil that you like. Except coconut oil. If you make mayo out 100% coconut oil, it sets up really firm in the fridge, ending up more like butter than mayo. Trust me on that. It was one of my many failed experiments! 😉

Note: I don’t ferment my mayo. Frankly, I use it so fast, that I am not concerned with extending the shelf-life of it and I eat enough other fermented foods, that I’m not worried about missing out on this one item. If you do want to ferment it, please do not use the typical “whey” way of fermenting it. Whey drops the pH of the mayo too low and you miss the critical lactofermentation steps. If you want to ferment it, I recommend following this recipe from Divine Health, which is based on the lactofermented mayo recipe from Lisa’s Counter Culture.

Delicious Obsessions Product Recommendations

My affiliate partner, Vitacost, has really good prices on some of the ingredients in this recipe. If you sign up through this link, you’ll get a coupon for $10 off your first purchase from Vitacost, and when your order ships, I’ll get a $10 off coupon for referring you. The cool thing about this program is that you can then refer your family and friends through your own link and YOU can get the $10 coupons too! 🙂

In addition, my affiliate partner, Tropical Traditions, is where I get all of my coconut products from and if you make a purchase from them through any of my links, you will receive a free copy of their Virgin Coconut Oil book, and I will receive a discount coupon for referring you.

Mountain Rose Herbs is where I get all of my herbs and spices. Because of their exceptional products and customer service, I am happy to support them as one of my affiliate partners. I have tried many brands of herbs over the years and keep coming back to Mountain Rose.

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About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food wellness educator and the founder of the Delicious Obsessions website. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. She began helping her mother cook and bake around the age of three and she's been in the kitchen ever since, including working in a restaurant in her hometown for almost a decade, where she worked every position before finally becoming the lead chef. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

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