Delicious Obsessions was founded by Jessica Espinoza in 2010. Jessica is passionate about real food, natural living, and more. She helps people see how to eat nourishing food, without breaking the bank. Her motto is "baby steps" -- making small, lasting changes, one at a time, is the best way to ensure long-term success.

This website contains "affiliate links" where appropriate, on which, I may earn a small commission or referral fee on your purchase. This has no effect on your price. The monies earned help maintain and support this website's hosting, maintenance, and the development of free content. The content shared on this site is for informational and educational purposes only. Statements/products discussed have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease or illness. Please consult your own health care practitioner before making changes to your current diet or before beginning any herbal or vitamin supplement regimen or exercise program.

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About Jessica Espinoza

Delicious Obsessions was founded by Jessica Espinoza in 2010. Jessica is passionate about real food, natural living, and more. She helps people see how to eat nourishing food, without breaking the bank. Her motto is "baby steps" -- making small, lasting changes, one at a time, is the best way to ensure long-term success. This website contains "affiliate links" where appropriate, on which, I may earn a small commission or referral fee on your purchase. This has no effect on your price. The monies earned help maintain and support this website's hosting, maintenance, and the development of free content. The content shared on this site is for informational and educational purposes only. Statements/products discussed have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease or illness. Please consult your own health care practitioner before making changes to your current diet or before beginning any herbal or vitamin supplement regimen or exercise program.

Fluffy Crustless Quiche (grain and gluten free, paleo / primal)


The Second Opinion Thyroid Summit

Fluffy Crustless Quiche (grain and gluten free, paleo / primal) Follow Me on Pinterest

 {Quiche is a fantastic one-dish meal — it can be eaten for breakfast, brunch, lunch, or even dinner. It is a great way to get a nourishing meal of inexpensive protein (eggs) and lots of veggies. This new recipe from Raia of Raia’s Recipes is perfect for those on a grain / gluten free diet. Enjoy! ~Jessica}

For years I have been tantalized by beautiful quiche recipes floating around my Facebook and Pinterest feeds, knowing I could never taste their fluffy, savory goodness. I was doomed to live a quiche-less life. An egg-less life, to be exact.

Ah, food intolerances… Fun, aren’t they?

Even though I had become quite proficient at cooking egg-free (and gluten, diary, and sugar-free), I often lamented to my friends, “If I could be un-allergic to anything, it would be eggs!

So, you might be wondering, “Why would a girl with an egg allergy be posting a quiche recipe?

To make a long story short(ish), a few months ago, my egg-free world was rocked.

Ever since the birth of baby number 4 a year and a half ago, my list of food intolerances had been steadily lengthening. I was at the place where it seemed like I was allergic to everything and I was fed up with it. So after months of research and prayer, my family and I went on the GAPS diet (you can read more about GAPS here).

As my body was cleaned of all its unhealthy bacteria and my intestines began to seal up, I slowly began adding back in my known food allergens. To my complete delight I was able to tolerate foods I hadn’t been able to eat for years! Broccoli, carrots, bananas, tomatoes, garlic, and … eggs!

Since the glorious day when I realized I no longer reacted to eggs (only fresh, pastured ones, mind you), I have been enjoy them raw, soft-boiled, scrambled, fried, hard-boiled, in soups, brownies, pancakes… and quiche. :)

Fluffy Crustless Quiche (grain and gluten free, paleo / primal) Follow Me on Pinterest

But enough about me, let’s talk a little about eggs.

You’ve probably heard that eggs are a complete protein, but did you know they also are rich in selenium? Selenium is critical for healthy reproduction, DNA synthesis, and thyroid hormone metabolism, plus a ton more stuff. Selenium is pretty important, people!

Eggs are also packed with riboflavin and vitamin B12, both of which are important for metabolic energy production, and phosphorus, which helps repair our body’s cells and tissue. Plus they’re full of healthy cholesterol and saturated fat! Yes, I did just use the word healthy in conjunction with cholesterol and saturated fat. Still afraid of saturated fats and cholesterol? Don’t be. And, go read this post NOW!

Since eggs are so good for you – and since I can now eat as many as I want – this quiche is jam-packed with them! I hope you enjoy!

Fluffy Crustless Quiche (grain and gluten free, paleo / primal) Follow Me on Pinterest

Fluffy Crustless Quiche (grain and gluten free, paleo / primal)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
I have linked to the products from my affiliate partners that I personally use and recommend. All funds earned go to help support the maintenance of this site and free content. Thank you! :)
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Serves: 9
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 and grease a 9×13 inch baking dish (you could probably bake it in 2 pie plates, or 9×9 inch-ers, but I’m all about fewer dishes).
  2. In large bowl, whip egg whites until fluffy and almost stiff.
  3. In separate bowl mix yolks, sausage, milk, garlic, herbs, and spices until thoroughly combined.
  4. With a spatula, carefully fold in egg whites until combined.
  5. Pour into prepared dish(es) and sprinkle with cheese, if using.
  6. Bake for 35 minutes, or until golden-browned on top.
  7. Serve with your choice of side(s).

About Raia

RaiaRaia is the stay-at-home-mom of four crazy kids who loves to create simple and healthy recipes. After finding out she was gluten and egg intolerant in 2010 she started her recipe blog to share her love of gluten-free baking (and chocolate) with others. In her spare time she enjoys doing laundry and dishes… not really. Check out her blog, Raia’s Recipes, and follow her on Google +, Pinterest, or Facebook.

 

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10 Health Benefits of Gelatin, plus 80 Ways to Eat More of It

10 Health Benefits of Gelatin, plus 80 Ways to Eat More of It // deliciousobsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest

Do you consume gelatin regularly? I do and there are many reasons why. Gelatin is one of those over-looked super foods that we all should be eating more of. 

If there is one food that all real foodies can agree on, it’s going to be gelatin. I first learned about the health benefits of gelatin in the book Nourishing Traditions. Even though I had grown up eating a real food diet, I never really knew why gelatin was so good for us until I read this book.

Gelatin has a number of health benefits:

  • Supports and promotes healthy skin, hair, and nails growth.
  • An easily assimilable source of collagen, which helps support skin elasticity.
  • Supports bones and joint mobility and helping improve joint recovery when injured.
  • Helps improve aid in digestion.
  • Helps heal the gut lining for those suffering from leaky gut.
  • Great source of a wide range of amino acids (18 in total).
  • Helps fight inflammation, due to the amino acid glycine.
  • Great source of easily digested protein (great for exercise recovery).
  • Can help promote better sleep, due to the amino acid glycine.
  • Can help calm and soothe nerves and anxiety, due to the amino acid glycine.
  • Can help stop bleeding from wounds both internally and externally.

When it comes to gelatin, quality is of the utmost importance. The very best way to consume more gelatin is to simply drink homemade bone broth or eat soups and sauces made from this bone broth.

Canned and boxed broths are going to have very little gelatin in them and are quite often filled with other unsavory ingredients. I recommend staying away from store-bought broth unless absolutely necessary.

Gelatin can also be found as a powdered food / supplement and this is a great way to get more into your diet if you are trying to up the amount your eating. But, make sure you are buying gelatin from grass-fed and pastured animals. Don’t buy the regular old gelatin at the grocery store, as that has come from feed lot cattle and factory farmed animals, which could potentially be sick. Definitely don’t need to be eating that.

Want to know more about why gelatin is the bomb beezy? Check out these awesome articles from a few of my friends:

And, for even more info on gelatin, I LOVE this book from my friend and affiliate partner, Sylvie of The Hollywood Homestead — The Gelatin Secret: The Surprising Superfood that Transforms Your Health and Beauty. She dives into all of the benefits of gelatin, how it improves our health (especially bone, joint, brain, skin, dental, and gut health), plus she offers some tasty recipes too!

Gelatin-Secret

All in all, gelatin is just downright good for us to eat, so let’s eat more of it!

Easy Ways to Add more Gelatin to Your Diet

Like I mentioned above, the best source of gelatin is going to be in your homemade bone broths. But, it’s always handy to keep a jar of gelatin powder on hand for times when you may not have homemade broth to eat (despite my best efforts, I do run out from time to time), or when you just want to add a little boost of nutrition to your food.

Right off the top of my head, here are some super simple ways to add more gelatin to your diet. Scan through these and then check out all the recipe ideas below!

  • Add gelatin to your smoothies for a protein boost.
  • Add gelatin to your coffee or tea.
  • Use gelatin to make tasty snacks and desserts.
  • Sprinkle some gelatin over your soups and stews.
  • Add gelatin to your sauces and gravies.

80 Delicious Ways to Eat More Gelatin

10 Health Benefits of Gelatin, plus 80 Ways to Eat More of It // deliciousobsessions.com #realfood #gelatin Follow Me on Pinterest

Consuming gelatin through your food is the best way to incorporate more into your diet. I eat soup every single day for lunch. I make that soup with my homemade bone broth and my body craves it. Since I am working on healing my leaky gut, I am trying to get gelatin into my diet in more ways that just soup and now, I am armed with all these delicious recipes to try!

Beverages & Smoothies

Desserts & Snacks

Everything Else

Tell me, what is your favorite way to eat gelatin? Have you experienced improved health since incorporating gelatin into your diet? Leave a comment below and don’t forget to check out Sylvie’s book, The Gelatin Secret (affiliate link)!

7

References

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Check Out My Interview on the Know Your Food Podcast!

Check Out My Interview on Know Your Food Podcast! // deliciousobsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest

Good morning! I hope your weekend is off to a great start!

This week, I was honored to be featured on Wardee Harmon’s Know Your Food Podcast. It was a lot of fun chatting with her. For those of you who don’t know, Wardee is the author of the GNOWFGLINS website, which I have been following for many years.

I hope you will check it out and learn a little more about me! :)

Listen to the full podcast here.

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Orange Coconut Cake (Paleo / Primal, gluten, grain, dairy free)

Orange Coconut Cake // DeliciousObsessions.com #paleo #primal #glutenfree #grainfree #dairyfree Follow Me on Pinterest

{Today, my friend Vivica from The Nourished Caveman shares a recipe for Orange Coconut Cake. This recipe looks divine and would be perfect for summer!}

Not all cakes are created equal!

When you give up grains, sugar and dairy, finding cake you can eat can become a challenge.

That is why this cake recipe exists. So even after having embarked in the journey of healthier eating, you can still enjoy some small (less guilty) pleasures!

You might be used to eating those gluten-rich, overly sweet cakes full of unhealthy fats, refined flours, and sugars. That cake and this one have nothing in common. Wait, they do have something in common: the name! But that’s where the similarity ends.

It might be difficult at first to get your palate used to this new kind of cake. To taste buds that have been constantly blasted with lots of refined sugar it will not seem sweet enough… Do have faith though, because it only takes 21 days of cutting back on sugar to almost completely re-educate your poor little taste buds and discover a whole new world of subtle flavors and scents.

Once you start ditching the bad foods, your palate will become much more refined, and you will find yourself appreciating a wider variety of foods.

Orange Coconut Cake // DeliciousObsessions.com #paleo #primal #glutenfree #grainfree #dairyfree Follow Me on Pinterest

Have your cake and eat it too!

That’s what eating this cake will do to you! In a nutritional sense at least.

Here is few of the good things you will provide you body by eating this cake:

  • Healthy fats: Coconut oil and cream, pastured eggs, and nut flours.
  • A low glycemic index vegetable, loaded with trace minerals: Yams.
  • Good protein source: Pastured Eggs and nut flours.
  • Good source of vitamin A, D, E and Beta Carotene: Pastured egg yolks.

Better than your typical high-sugar, low-nutrition cake, right?

Enjoy this easy recipe, I hope it will bring some orangey sweetness to your life!

Orange Coconut Cake // DeliciousObsessions.com #paleo #primal #glutenfree #grainfree #dairyfree Follow Me on Pinterest

Our affiliate partner, Vitacost, has really good prices on some of the ingredients in this recipe. If you sign up through this link, you’ll get a coupon for $10 off your first purchase from Vitacost, and when your order ships, I’ll get a $10 off coupon for referring you!

In addition, Tropical Traditions, has great coconut products and if you make a purchase from them through any of my links, you will receive a free copy of their Virgin Coconut Oil book, and I will receive a discount coupon for referring you.

Orange-Coconut Paleo Cake
 
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Cook time
Total time
 
I have linked to the products from my affiliate partners that I personally use and recommend. All funds earned go to help support the maintenance of this site and free content. Thank you! :)
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert, Breakfast
Serves: 6
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  2. In a small pot, mix the coconut oil and cream, add the stick of vanilla and melt on a very low flame for about 10 minutes, then let sit for another 5.
  3. In a large bowl mix the Orange zest, the baking soda and the 3 flours.
  4. Mix well, even with your hands, so that the zest blends and flavors the flours.
  5. Add the grated yams to the bowl and mix well.
  6. While you are waiting for the coconut cream to cool, grease a 9″ round springform and line the bottom with parchment paper.
  7. Remove the vanilla stick form the cream.
  8. Crack eggs into a blender and add the coconut cream mix to it.
  9. Blend well until frothy.
  10. Add the egg blend to the dry ingredients and mix well.
  11. Pour the cake mix into the springform pan and bake for 35 minutes, or until an inserted toothpick will come out dry.
  12. Remove the cake form the oven and let cool.
  13. For the frosting, in a small bowl mix the honey with the coconut cream until perfectly mixed.
  14. Put in the refrigerator to cool for at least 30 min.
  15. Once the cake has cooled down and the cream has hardened, you can spread it on the cake.
  16. Decorate with a bit of the orange zest and dried orange slices.

About Vivica

About Vivica Menegaz, Contributor to DeliciousObsessions.comVivica is a blogger, cook, nutrition consultant, traveler, photographer and expat. Graduate of Pasadena Art Center for Design. Previous resident of Milano, Los Angeles, Salvador Bahia; currently residing in Northern California on a small homestead with her husband and many pets. You can find her writing at The Nourished Caveman, follow her on Facebook, or pin with her on Pinterest.

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The Pros and Cons of the Paleo Diet

Paleo: Right and Wrong About Eating Like a Caveman // deliciousobsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest

This article is shared today with permission from Dr. Mercola. I have followed the paleo style of eating for several years now and I think this is one of the best styles of eating for anyone who is trying to create long-term health and manage or improve chronic illness. Dr. Mercola makes some great points in this article, which is why I want to share it today. Before we get started, I want to share a few of my thoughts on this article:

1. I think it’s important that we all experiment to see what works best for us. There is no “one-size-fits-all” when it comes to eating styles. For me, paleo, and more specifically, the autoimmune paleo protocol make the most sense for my life and my health. For others, it may not make as much sense. That said, if you suffer from any sort of chronic illness (and most of us do nowadays), it is worth looking into. I have seen countless testimonials from people who have reversed a wide variety of illnesses (high-blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, etc.) through the Paleo-style of eating.

2. This style of eating (like any other style) can easily be tailored to suit your own needs. There is no perfect blueprint, simply suggestions and guides that can help you tweak things to work for you. I know plenty of paleo folks who may include a little raw dairy here and there, or maybe white rice on occasion, or even some lentils or other legumes. Experimenting is the key!

3. I advocate the paleo diet, strictly from a nutritional standpoint. As a Christian, I do not adhere to any of the beliefs about our paleolithic, caveman “ancestors”. To me, that is not an important aspect of this eating style, it just happens to be what the style is named, but I have been asked about it in the past, which is why I wanted to address it. I do believe that our ancestors ate wheat and grains and drank milk, etc. with no problems at all. The important thing here is to understand that the foods they were eating thousands of years ago are NOT the same as we have today. Man has messed with our food supply to the point that much of it is unrecognizable and toxic to our bodies. 

4. Lastly, what IS important is that this style of eating has been very beneficial in my regaining my health, and I am not alone. I know countless people, both personally and through the Web, that have changed their lives for the better by following this style of eating and I encourage anyone facing health challenges to at least test it out and see how they feel. ~Jessica

~~~~~~~

Paleo: Right and Wrong About Eating Like a Caveman

By Dr. Mercola

The Paleo Diet is one of the hottest diet trends around. With celebrity followers and even high-end restaurants taking notice of Paleo principles, some might even say Paleo has gone mainstream. As the diet has grown in popularity, so too have its vocal supporters… and critics.

There’s now a growing debate over whether the Paleo Diet is truly healthful or not, so I want to take a moment and shed some light on this method of eating. I thought I should comment, as many in the media describe my recommendations as Paleo, which they aren’t.

The Paleo Diet: What Is It?

While we may consider ourselves to be at the pinnacle of human development, our modern food manufacturing processes have not created a race of super-humans in possession of greater health and longevity.

Quite the contrary… Humans today suffer more chronic and debilitating diseases than ever before. And there can be little doubt that our food choices play a major role in this development.

During the Paleolithic period, many thousands of years ago, people ate primarily vegetables, fruit, nuts, roots, and meat, which varied depending on season and availability.

Based upon scientific research examining the types and quantities of foods our hunter-gatherer ancestors ate, the foundation of “The Paleo Diet” is lean meat, including ostrich and bison as well as organ meats, seafood, fresh fruit, and non-starchy vegetables — a far cry from the standard American diet.

Today, these staples have been largely replaced with refined sugar, high fructose corn syrup, cereal, bread, potatoes, and pasteurized milk products. Most Americans eat a much narrower selection of fruits, vegetables, roots, and nuts, and in lesser quantities than our “cavemen” ancestors.

“Normalizing” your system is the true strength of the so-called caveman diet. By eating foods that are concordant with your genetic ancestry, you can avoid many of the diseases associated with our modern diet, and which far too many still believe is predetermined by “bad genes.” As Dr. Loren Cordain, author of The Paleo Dietand one of the world’s leading experts on Paleolithic nutrition, stated:

“The nutritional qualities of modern processed foods and foods introduced during the Neolithic period are discordant with our ancient and conservative genome. This genetic discordance ultimately manifests itself as various chronic illnesses, which have been dubbed ”diseases of civilization.’

 By severely reducing or eliminating these foods and replacing them with a more healthful cuisine, possessing nutrient qualities more in line with the foods our ancestors consumed, it is possible to improve health and reduce the risk of chronic disease.”

What Do the Critics Say About Paleo Principles?

It’s hard to argue against replacing modern processed foods with whole foods from nature. But critics argue that the Paleo Diet may be too restrictive, putting strict followers at risk of nutritional deficiencies and proving to be unrealistic to follow for the average American.

In its 2014 rankings of the “Best Diets Overall,” U.S. News & World Report rated the Paleo Diet dead last at #31 (tied for last place with the relatively unheard of Dukan diet — even Slim Fast placed #13),1 noting:

Experts took issue with the diet on every measure. Regardless of the goal—weight loss, heart health, or finding a diet that’s easy to follow—most experts concluded that it would be better for dieters to look elsewhere.”

The criticism largely surrounds the diet’s restriction of grains and dairy, the former of which is one of the key reasons why Paleo eating is far healthier than the average American diet. Another oft-cited criticism of the Paleo Diet is minimal research supporting its benefits, although there are clinical trials (albeit small ones) supporting its use.

For instance, a study by researchers from the University of California had out-of-shape volunteers eat a Paleo Diet for two weeks. In that time, their blood pressure levels decreased, as did their levels of cholesterol, by an average of 30 points, which the researchers compared to “the type of drop you get by taking statins for six months.” Their levels of triglycerides also improved.2

Finally, U.S. News’ ranking suggests that the Paleo Diet is unrealistic because the panelists didn’t believe it was possible to find the appropriate foods in the modern era. Nothing could be further from the truth, because food selection today is no longer dictated by your environment as it was so long ago, but rather by your choices at the supermarket or, better, the farmer’s market.

While you wouldn’t be able to find many of the wild varieties of plant foods eaten by cavemen even if you wanted to, because modern agriculture has largely taken over the food supply and tweaked and shrunk it to where only a few varieties of wheat, corn, and other plant foods are left, you can certainly mold your diet around the principles of Paleo eating rather simply just by tweaking the way you shop.

The Paleo Diet May Be a Problem for Some People

While I do believe that the Paleo Diet can be a healthful way of eating, especially compared to the Standard American Diet, I also believe it has certain weaknesses or flaws that could be improved upon.

The primary one is that I believe it has far too much protein for most people. Protein is freely substituted for carbs as being a healthy choice. I believe it is the rare person who really needs more than one-half gram of protein per pound of lean body mass. Those that are aggressively exercising and competing or pregnant women should have about 25% more, but most people rarely need more than 40-70 grams of protein a day.

To determine your lean body mass, find out your percent body fat and subtract from 100. So if you are 20% body fat you would have 80% lean body mass. Just multiply that by your current weight to get lean body mass. For most people, this means restricting protein intake from 35 to 75 grams a day. As mentioned, pregnant women and those working out extensively need about 25% more protein though.

Also, some believe that the Paleo Diet is too low-carb for some people. Generally speaking, if you’re on a high-carb diet and suddenly reduce your carb intake, your blood cholesterol profile will improve. Typically, your triglyceride levels will be sharply reduced.

However, if your carb intake is below 25 percent (the Paleo Diet is about 23 percent carbs), your body will have to adapt to a scarcity of glucose, which can cause hormonal changes that may negatively impact your blood lipids. According to Dr. Paul Jaminet, a trained astrophysicist and author of the book Perfect Health Diet, you may be able to tolerate an extremely low-carb diet if your health is really good, because your body can manufacture some glucose from protein. Others may not fare as well. He explained:

“The biggest problem is it’s not a robust diet. If you get infections (which will raise your body’s glucose needs), then you can really get into trouble on a zero carb diet. In general, it’s a stressful thing for your body.”

While some experts, such as Dr. Ron Rosedale, believe you can’t have too little glucose because it’s always going to cause some adverse metabolic consequence, Dr. Jaminet, on the other hand, believes that once you get below a certain threshold of glucose in your diet, you can start experiencing certain health challenges.

I have revised my position on using low carb long term and now believe that the low carb, low to moderate protein, high healthy fat diet is appropriate for most who are insulin or leptin resistant. Once that resistance resolves, then it likely becomes counterproductive to maintain a low-carb approach. Once your weight, blood pressure, sugar, and cholesterol normalize, you can increase your carbs. Personally, I now consume several pieces of fruit a day and have two dozen fruit trees in my yard, but my body weight, fat and insulin resistance are all optimized.

Does the Paleo Diet Contain Too Much Protein and Not Enough Fat?

When you are treating insulin/leptin resistance, I believe most would benefit by decreasing  carb consumption, and replacing them with healthy fats. Replacing carbs with too much protein can actually cause health challenges similar to eating too many grain carbs and sugars. The Paleo Diet is about 38 percent protein and 39 percent fat, which may actually be too much protein and not enough fat for optimal health.

When you consume protein in levels higher than recommended above, you tend to activate the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway, which can help you get large muscles but can also increase your risk of cancer. This pathway is ancient but relatively recently appreciated and has only been known for less than 20 years.

Odds are very high your doctor was never taught this in medical school and isn’t even aware of it. Many new cancer drugs are actually being targeted to use this pathway. Drugs using this pathway have also been given to animals to radically extend their lifespan. But you don’t have to use drugs to get this pathway to work for you.

As mentioned, when you reduce protein, you need to replace it with other calories, so the key is to replace the lost calories with high-quality fats such as avocados, butter, coconut oil, nuts, and eggs. Your healthiest option is to ensure your carbs come primarily from fresh, organic vegetables, eat limited amounts of high-quality protein, and eat primarily a high-fat diet. Depending on the type of carbs (high fiber or not), most people need anywhere between 50-75 percent fat in their diet and sometimes even higher for optimal health.

Key Differences Between My Nutrition Plan and the Paleo Diet

My nutrition plan has many similarities with the Paleo Diet, namely the restriction of sugars and grains, increases in fresh vegetables and a focus on finding high-quality, toxin-free food sources. However, there are some key differences that I want to highlight, as I believe these factors can make a significant difference in your health. My nutrition plan contains the following dietary advice, which the Paleo Diet is lacking:

  • Less protein, higher healthy fat: In general, it would be unusual for most adults to need more than 100 grams of protein and most likely need close to half that amount. When you reduce protein, you need to replace it with other calories, specifically high-quality fats such as avocados, butter, coconut oil, olives, olive oil, nuts, and eggs.
  • Dairy is allowed: Dairy, particularly full-fat raw dairy, is allowed in my nutrition plan. I personally do not drink much milk nor think it is necessary to drink milk, but raw dairy does have some worthwhile nutritional components, as do other whole raw dairy products, like raw-milk cheese.
  • Seafood should be eaten with caution: The Paleo Diet includes fish and other seafood as a regular meal. However, it is difficult to find seafood that is free from toxin buildup as a result of pollution. For this reason, I recommend only safe sources of seafood, such as wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, and anchovies, as well as a high-quality, animal-based omega-3 fat supplement (krill oil) to make up for lacking seafood in your diet.
  • Fermented vegetables: One of the best ways to protect your health is by keeping your gut flora healthy by eating naturally fermented foods. Fermented vegetables are a key component of this and are highly recommended in my nutrition plan. One-quarter to one-half cup of fermented veggies with each meal is ideal, but you may need to work up to this amount gradually.
  • Intermittent fasting: The Paleo Diet is supportive of intermittent fasting, although it does not specifically highlight it. However, intermittent fasting or “scheduled eating” is one of the most powerful interventions I know of to shed excess weight and reduce your risk of chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease. There are many different variations of intermittent fasting, but if you are like 85 percent of the population and have insulin resistance, my personal recommendation is to fast every day by simply scheduling your eating into a narrower window of time.

In Doubt About What to Eat? Read My Nutrition Plan

Dietary advice can be a bit of a moving target, as everyone has unique nutritional needs and what’s “best” is a highly controversial topic in the media. To be most beneficial, dietary advice needs to be regularly revised based on new research and increases in wisdom from personal explorations of applying this research.

There are some dietary basics that are foundational, which I believe will likely never really change, at least in our lifetimes, such as avoiding processed foods and limiting sugar intake as much as possible. But virtually everything else is evolution in process. The challenge is to keep up-to-date with it all and have a process that allows you to integrate this information using an easily digestible format.

That is one of the primary reasons behind the compilation of my nutrition plan. In the ‘90s I rejected the idea of writing a book, as by the time it was printed it would be out of date. That is one of the reasons I chose to focus my efforts on the Internet. I strongly recommend reviewing my nutrition plan whenever your schedule allows. It is a very detailed and comprehensive program – it’s basically an entire book in multimedia format. The plan is divided into three stages: beginner, intermediate, and advanced. If you realize you’re already doing all the things included in the beginner’s phase, then it may be time to move on to the next phase.

If you’re new to the site, I encourage you to go through it from the beginning, as it is one of the most powerful tools to truly allow you and your family to take control of your health. If you’re a Paleo Diet fan, you may be able to jump in at the intermediate or advanced level, taking your health to an even higher level than you had before.

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