How to Make Tigernut Milk (a dairy-free, AIP-friendly beverage)

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Today I am going to teach you how to make tigernut milk. You may be thinking the very thing I thought when I first heard about this non-dairy milk:

What the heck is a tigernut and how do you make milk from it?

Well, it’s super easy, fast, and delicious!

What is a Tigernut?

Recently, I did a video where I discussed what tigernuts are and the different products you can make from them. You can watch that here:

 

Tigernuts are not actually a nut. They are a tuber (root vegetable) and they are the #1 source of resistant starch. For more info on tigernuts and resistant starch, see this National Center for Biotechnology Information research article.

Resistant starch is something that you may be seeing more info on in the natural health world, as many experts are becoming aware of the importance of this starch in our diet.

Resistant starch resists the digestive process and moves into the gut to become food for our good bacteria. It is a PREbiotic that feeds our PRObiotics.

And we all know how important it is to keep our probiotics in our gut healthy and happy!

Tigernuts are a superfood that originates in the Mediterranean and North Africa.  They are very high in fiber, as well as iron (as much as red meat), potassium (as much as coconut water), magnesium, zinc, phosphorus, and vitamins E and C.

What do Tigernuts Taste Like?

Tigernuts have an interesting taste and texture. They are slightly sweet and have a mellow nutty flavor (despite not being a nut).

I personally love the taste and find them quite pleasant to snack on. And because they are so high in fiber, a small handful is all you need to feel full and satiated.

You can eat them raw, but I do have to warn you that they have a weird texture, are pretty hard, and do require some chewing. I kind of like it, but some may not.

You can also soak them in warm water and a little salt and it makes them much softer and more palatable for some people.

I like them both ways.

What is Tigernut Milk?

Tigernut milk has become my favorite non-dairy milk of late. While I still love coconut milk (and almond and cashew milk on occasion), I was looking for something different.

Tigernut milk delivers.

The slightly sweet, nutty flavor comes through in the milk and it is delicious mixed with smoothies, coffee, tea, or plain.

It is super easy to make and can be flavored in a huge variety of ways.

Tigernut milk is sometimes referred to as tigernut horchata. The horchata that most of us are familiar with is typically made with rice, but did you know that traditionally in Spain, tigernuts were used to make horchata, not rice?

This is a traditional food any way you slice it!

How to Make Tigernut Milk

Making your own tigernut milk / horchata is super easy. Watch my video tutorial below!

 

Where Do I Find Tigernuts?

You can get your tigernuts online. I buy mine from Vitacost or Amazon. They have great prices and I do a lot of shopping with them anyways, so it’s easy to just toss a bag in the basket whenever I’m doing an order. They also carry tigernut flour and tigernut cereal.

If you sign up through this link, you’ll get a coupon for $10 off your first purchase from Vitacost, and when your order ships, I’ll get a $10 off coupon for referring you. The cool thing about this program is that you can then refer your family and friends through your own link and YOU can get the $10 coupons too! 🙂

How to Make Tigernut Milk
 
Author:
Recipe type: Beverage
Cuisine: Dairy-Free, AIP, Autoimmune friendly
Ingredients
  • 2 cups raw tigernuts (find them on Vitacost or Amazon)
  • 4 cups filtered water
  • ¼ tsp. sea salt
  • Flavorings of your chose (optional) - vanilla, cinnamon, nutmeg, honey, maple syrup, etc. are all lovely.
  • Additional water for pureeing
Instructions
  1. Place your tigernuts in a bowl or a Mason jar. I like to use a Mason jar so it has a lid.
  2. Add your sea salt.
  3. Pour your water over the tigernuts, cover, and let soak for 24-48 hours (place the jar in the fridge so they don't start to ferment). The longer they soak, the softer they will be and better they will puree into milk.
  4. Once soaked, pour the tigernuts and liquid through a colander and rinse well.
  5. Place the tigernuts in your blender and add 2 cups of filtered water. You don't want to use a ton of water here in order to preserve the flavor of the tigernuts. You can always add more water later, so start with less than you think you need.
  6. If you are adding any flavorings, you can add those now.
  7. Puree on high until smooth and creamy (2-4 minutes, depending on the blender).
  8. Pour through a fine mesh strainer, nut bag, cheese cloth, etc. to separate the milk from the pureed tigernuts.
  9. Place the tigernut puree back in the blender and add another 1-2 cups of water. Puree again for a couple minutes.
  10. Strain off the milk. You can combine with the first batch, or keep separate. The subsequent batches won't be as rich and creamy as the very first batch.
  11. You can re-process the tigernuts 2-3 times.
  12. Once you're done, pour the milk into a glass jar and store the in the fridge for 3-4 days.
  13. You can use the tigernut pulp in your smoothies, or just eat it off the spoon. I am currently working on some new recipes utilizing the tigernut pulp and will share those soon!

So, what do you think? Have you tried tigernuts? Do you like them? Leave a comment below!

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About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food wellness educator and the founder of the Delicious Obsessions website. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. She began helping her mother cook and bake around the age of three and she's been in the kitchen ever since, including working in a restaurant in her hometown for almost a decade, where she worked every position before finally becoming the lead chef. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

Discussion

55 comments

  1. Do tiger nuts give you gas like Jerusalem artichoke (sunchokes)?

    reply 

    Sheila Israel
    Posted 02/17/15

    • Hi Sheila! Nope! At least not me. I can’t eat sunchokes as they give me SEVERE digestive “distress”. 😉 But I have had not issues with tigernuts.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/17/15

  2. Great tutorial, Jessica, thank you. I’ve made tigernut milk exactly like you demonstrated and it is by far the best tasting non dairy milk I’ve tasted. Do you know for sure that there is resistant starch in the extracted “milk”?

    Looking forward to your ideas/recipes for using the pulp up. These are delicious but so expensive!

    reply 

    Heidi
    Posted 02/17/15

    • Hey Heidi – Some of the resistant starch does come through in the milk (I’m not 100% sure what the ratio is). You’ll see it settle to the bottom of your jar in the fridge. It’s not as much as just eating the tigernuts whole, but you do get some. I agree, they are pricey, but they taste SOOOOO good. It is by far my favorite non-dairy milk now. 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/18/15

  3. Where can I buy tiger nuts?

    reply 

    Rachel Kacsur
    Posted 02/17/15

  4. I want to compliment you on your video. You are organized and concise…no um’s or ah’s in your presentation. I’ve put tiger nuts on my grocery list and am looking forward to trying a new beverage! You go, girl!

    reply 

    Annie Warren
    Posted 02/18/15

    • Hi Annie! Thank you for watching! The ums and ahs are SOOOO hard for me. I have become very conscious of how many times I say those now. Having a script to keep me on track is quite helpful! Hope you like them! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/18/15

  5. Hi Jessica,

    Please don’t be reluctant to do videos. I watched you tiger nut milk video and discovered that you are very attractive and that you do an EXCELLENT presentation.

    reply 

    Jacob
    Posted 02/18/15

  6. I’ve been using tigernut milk for about 3 months; luv it. I was having issues with fermentation so I appreciate your direction to put the tigernuts in the frig while they are soaking; none of the other recipes out on the web suggest that.

    We rinse and soak 8 ounces of tigernuts and rinse again at the end; we only process them once with 4 cups of water. We use a muslin nut-milk bag and after draining, REALLY, squeeze every last drop of milk out possible. We then dehydrate the pulp and when i’ts dried out, “grind” it in the food processor for flour which we store in the freezer until ready to use. So far, I am finding the tigernut flour substitutes well for coconut flour (which I no longer can eat.)

    I actually like it a lot more than coconut milk. We like adding cinnamon and I find it does not need any sweetener because it already has a pleasant sweetness to it, without being overwhelmingly so.

    reply 

    Shari
    Posted 02/18/15

    • Hi Shari! Isn’t it great stuff? I can’t get over how delicious it is! For right now at least, I like it more than coconut milk. 🙂 I am glad that the tip on fermentation was helpful!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/18/15

  7. Vanessa, great video on making tiger nut milk! And it was good to see your face 🙂 I’m glad to hear that tiger nuts don’t give you intestinal distress. I’ll be interested to see what new ideas you discover to use the pulp.

    reply 

    Stef
    Posted 02/18/15

    • Hi Stef! Thanks for watching! I am glad you liked it. More videos coming this year now that I am getting over my fear of the camera. 🙂 And yes, I am trying to come up with some creative stuff with the pulp! Cheers! ~Jessica

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/18/15

  8. Hi Jessica,

    Great post, just a little correction from someone born in Horchata land, Valencia (Spain), which incidentally, is also the Paella land. Tigernuts are called “chufas” in Spanish (“xufes” in the Valencian language), and real horchata (“orxata” in Valencian) is only from chufas, not rice. Rice orxata is just an industrial invention because it is cheaper and because artificial flavors can attempt to achieve the xufes flavour (the “a” turns “e” for the plural form). Of course there is nothing like real orxata de xufa, which is the only one Valencians would touch.
    The cradle of orxata is Alboraya, a town near Valencia city. You find the best orxata there. It is served both frozen (like a smoothy) or fluid, there’s also the in-between version. There’s a whole orxata de xufa culture-tradition in Valencia, everyday stuff and gourmet. If you like tigernut milk, I do encourage you to seek real Valencian orxata; always 100% from xufa, no rice at all, not for a Valencian 🙂 . All love and congrats for your articles. I hope you enjoy the trivia!

    reply 

    Inma Lazaro
    Posted 02/22/15

    • Interesting Inma! Thank you for taking the time to stop by and share! I learn something new every day! 🙂 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/22/15

      • My pleasure! Thank you so much for your posts!

        reply 

        Inma Lazaro
        Posted 02/23/15

  9. How much resistent starch is in the raw tubers? I can’t find that info anywhere.

    reply 

    Brad
    Posted 02/25/15

    • Hi Brad – There are 10 grams of fiber per one ounce serving. I’m not sure if all of that is considered resistant starch or not. For specifics, you may want to contact Organic Gemini: http://organicgemini.com/

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/25/15

  10. Loved the video. Good job on that.
    Went to order the nuts,only to find that shipping was more than 3 times the cost of the nuts,–so no going to do it. But hopefully the price of shipping will come down someday.

    reply 

    Connie
    Posted 03/05/15

    • Connie – Thanks for watching! Try looking on Amazon. That is where I have ordered in the past. I have Prime, so I get free shipping, but I think you can still get them for free shipping if your order is over $25! Hope that helps! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 03/06/15

  11. I’m definitely going to try this! But I’m going to use a CLEAN coffee press to extract the “milk” from the ground up nuts….Just thought it might make things much easier….

    reply 

    Pam
    Posted 06/28/15

    • Pam – Great idea! Use what you have! I’m all about finding ways to make things easier! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/30/15

  12. Can I just put the tigernuts in my vitamix to make tigernut flour? I’m not a fan of the chewiness of the tigernuts, though I love the flavor. I’ve never liked milk, so I don’t have much need for a milk substitute, but I’d like to find a way to use my tigernuts. I was going to buy the flour, but since I’ve already spent the money on the nuts, I was wondering if I could make my own flour. Does anyone know?

    reply 

    Cindy
    Posted 07/07/15

    • Hi Cindy – I’ve never tried it! The only concern I’d have is that it would turn into tigernut butter super fast. If you try it, let me know how it goes. I’ll give it a whirl next time I have a bag of tigernuts on hand! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/08/15

  13. Hi Jessica. Thank you for all you’ve done. Can you tell me how to extend the shelf life of the tigernuts milk?

    reply 

    JOA
    Posted 07/08/15

    • Hi JOA – I honestly don’t know how you could extend the shelf life. I’ve had some stay in the fridge for a week and it smelled off. Short of adding a preservative, I don’t think there’s a way. I guess you could try boiling it and then storing it. That would “pasteurize” it in a way. LMK if you ever give it a try! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/08/15

  14. Hi! I totally forgot about my soaking tiger nuts. They have been in the fridge uncovered for two, two and a half weeks. Are they still safe to make milk with?

    reply 

    Ju
    Posted 07/19/15

    • Hi Ju – Maybe, though I have found that when I leave them over 5-7 days, they start smelling really nasty. I’ll have to leave this up to you and your nose. 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/23/15

  15. interesting piece you have here. am concerned about preserving the milk. i place it in the fridge and by the nest day its bad.i.e changes in colour and a sour taste plus saparation of ingredients. pls how best can i preserve my tiger nut milk for at least three days

    reply 

    faith
    Posted 08/07/15

    • Hi Faith – That is odd. I’ve never had it spoil overnight like that. 3-4 days seems to be the max time for me otherwise it does start to smell weird. I always make it just like I outline above and it lasts for those 3 days with no spoilage. I’m honestly not sure why yours would be souring so quickly.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 08/09/15

  16. Hello good day everyone,tigernut milk is everybody liking,it taste delicious try adding coconut and arab date to it,this is how we do here in nigeria “africa”.we have tigernut here abundantly and very cheap.

    reply 

    Saikabuzay
    Posted 08/25/15

  17. Hi thanks so much for the video, prior to watching, i did my milk and it was too watery, i think i added too much water, after this video i have a perfect milk and everybody loves it. i sometimes add the milk to my cakes and biscuits and it tastes great. Sesime from Ghana, West Africa

    reply 

    Sesime
    Posted 10/05/15

  18. Hello Jessica!
    I love tigernut milk!
    I live in Nigeria and it’s in abundance in the north.
    I live down south, but it’s still very accessible. It’s kind of a staple in the north too.
    I sweetened mine with date syrup and spiced it up a little with some ginger juice.
    Loved it!

    reply 

    Gbemi
    Posted 11/17/15

    • So awesome Gbemi! I wish it was more accessible and affordable here. It’s still considered a treat food for me since the prices are a little high. But hopefully more people will start learning about it so it can create more demand. The ginger and date combo sounds heavenly! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 11/19/15

  19. am yet to prepare the milk.. over here in Ghana the tiger nut is very cheap.

    reply 

    kwame darko
    Posted 11/27/15

    • Yes, I’ve had several people from Africa say how cheap they are over there. Here in the States they are still a little pricey, but hopefully the prices will drop as demand grows and they become more accessible. The milk is so good and a definite treat for me! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 11/27/15

  20. Hello Jessica I’m also from nigeria, we call it ‘aya’ I live up north and it’s really affordable less than $1 can get you a large bowl of tigernuts! The taste is divine! We chew it as a snack, make smoothies and yogurts with it and also juice it.

    reply 

    kate
    Posted 02/09/16

    • Awesome! I wish they were that affordable here! 🙂 I just went to do some price comparison and had to forgo an order because it just didn’t fit into our food budget this month. I do love them though! SO tasty! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/14/16

  21. Love your video! I have discovered tigernuts recently, and would love to try and make milk. However, the only affordable form I find here in France is tigernut flour, and whole tigernuts seem so pricey! Do you think I could attempt making the milk from the flour or would it make a difference in texture? I have tried to make to make tigernut butter, which I meant as a sunflower sort of butter, but it was too grainy and gritty under my teeth, kind of the brownies I made with tigernut flour, actually. I would love to have the taste of tigernut, which I absolutely love, without that grittiness that really bothers me!

    reply 

    marina
    Posted 03/12/16

    • Hi Marina – Thanks for stopping by! So glad you liked the video. I’ve never tried it with the flour. I imagine it might work, though you would need to use A LOT of water because the flour is very fibrous and will soak up the water pretty quickly. I agree that the prices are pretty high on the tigernuts. I don’t buy them very often for that reason. I’ve been trying to find a way to buy them in bulk for a lower price, but have not found anything that fits my budget right now. I love the tigernut flour in baked goods. SO tasty! 🙂 Hope that helps!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 03/15/16

  22. Thank you so much for teaching us an easier way to make the tiger nut milk. I am 38 years old and hypertensive. I made the milk two days ago before I learnt about your recepie. I drank a glass of it just before going to bed. The following morning, my BP was an amazing 111/65mmHg. Previous reading was in the range of 130/88mmHg. Ofio(tiger nut in Yoruba language)is really good. I did not sweeten it with anything, I love it’s natural taste.

    reply 

    Busola
    Posted 03/21/16

    • Hi Busola! So glad it was helpful and YAY for the improved BP reading! That is fantastic! I love the taste of the tigernut milk just like it is too. I never add any other sweeteners, though a little vanilla extract is nice. Thanks for stopping by! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 03/22/16

  23. Would tiger nuts be really good or really bad for SIBO diets?

    reply 

    Suzanne Clegg
    Posted 05/27/16

    • Hi Suzanne! I am not super well versed in SIBO, but it is my understanding that they are not allowed because of the high levels of resistant starch. I would definitely check with your practitioner about it and see what they say. Hope that helps! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/30/16

  24. How do you keep the milk from getting slimy – like one big glob of slime that didn’t pour? It tasted delicious when I first made it but 2 days later the texture was so disgusting I had to throw it out.

    Thank you,
    BHealthy

    reply 

    BHealthy
    Posted 06/14/16

    • Hi there! I have never had that happen! Wow! I would imagine if it’s like that it may have gone bad? Mine has always stayed smooth and never globbed up or had a slimy texture. It does have a relatively short shelf-life though so maybe 2 days was even too much for your batch. I usually try to drink mine up within 3 days at the most. Sorry I can’t be more help!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/15/16

  25. Hi! Can I boil my milk if my nuts seem to be going bad?

    reply 

    Monica
    Posted 06/23/16

    • Hi Monica – I have never done that and personally wouldn’t. While the boiling might kill any bad bugs that would be in there, I do feel that once the tigernut milk spoils the taste is no longer palatable. If you find that yours are going bad before you can use them, you can try putting them in the freezer to prolong their shelf-life.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/23/16

  26. How to preserve tigernut for at least one month

    reply 

    Dennis Sarpong Amfo
    Posted 07/03/16

    • Hi Dennis – You would need to store the tigernut milk in the freezer in order to preserve long-term. Enjoy!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/07/16

  27. Just wondering if there’s any reason why I can’t throw the soaked nuts in my juicer and reserve the pulp to use as flour? Had seen mention of this once elsewhere but cannot find it now. Thanks.

    reply 

    Tam
    Posted 07/17/16

    • Hi Tam – I really doubt the juicer would work as well as running them in the blender, but if you try it let me know how it goes. I’d be interested to hear. You can totally dehydrate the pulp if you want and make flour out of it, or just use it in smoothies, baked goods, etc. Hope that helps!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/17/16

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