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Love Your Liver Herbal Coffee

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Love Your Liver Herbal Coffee // deliciousobsessions.com #herbs #herbalremedies #herbalcoffee Follow Me on Pinterest

We all want to love our livers, right? I mean, they are a really important organ! This love your liver herbal coffee is not only delicious, but it helps support healthy liver function.

Some of you may remember awhile back when I shared my recipe for cinnamon vanilla herbal coffee.

I love that stuff.

I drink it hot, iced, and frozen.

But, as I’ve continued to expand my herbal research and work on giving my liver and digestion as much support as possible as I work on healing my gut, I have developed a new recipe that I want to share today.

I call this my “happy liver herbal coffee“.

But, why does it make my liver happy?

Because of the herbs that are in it!

There are four herbs that go into this coffee: chicory root, dandelion root, milk thistle seeds, and burdock root. Let’s look at how each of these herbs benefits the body.

Chicory Root

Chicory is related to the dandelion. According to my affiliate partner, Mountain Rose Herbs, the root of the plant has been used as a coffee substitute for generations, especially in times where coffee beans may have been scarce or unavailable. In Egypt, it’s been cultivated along the Nile river area for thousands of years. Even Charlemagne required that it be grown in his garden. In the 18th century, it was brought to North America from Europe.

Chicory is high in vitamin C and also has the highest concentration of inulin of any other plant containing inulin. Inulin acts as a prebiotic in your gut. Chicory has long been used for liver support, as it is a natural detoxifier and also promotes bile flow.

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Dandelion Root

To many lawn owners, the poor dandelion is considered an enemy that needs to be slaughtered, but it is actually a very nutritious food and serves a very important role in the ecosystem. Dandelion roots have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) for thousands of years, and are known as an herb that helps “cool the blood.” There is a lot of folklore surrounding dandelions, and a simple Google search will yield countless articles about the mystical and magical aspects of dandelions.

According to Mountain Rose Herbs, dandelion roots are unusually high in potassium. They also contain substantial levels of vitamins A, C, D, and B complex, in addition to crucial minerals like iron, magnesium, zinc, manganese, copper, choline, calcium, boron, and silicon. Check out this post on the importance of dandelions and a tasty dandelion flower fritter recipe.

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Milk Thistle Seeds

Milk thistle is a member of the sunflower family and it native to the Mediterranean. Over the years, it has become naturalized throughout Europe and now is found in Oregon and California (most people consider it an obnoxious weed). The leaves of the milk thistle are edible and can make a delicious addition to salads, with a taste that is similar to lettuce.

According to Mountain Rose Herbs:

Three of the active compounds within milk thistle seed are collectively identified as silymarin. This constituent is credited for much of milk thistle’s medicinal value, particularly that which is associated with healthy liver support. The German Commission E has approved an extract of 70% silymarin in supporting healthy liver function … milk thistle seed can cause mild diarrhea by stimulating the release of bile.

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Burdock Root

Like dandelion and milk thistle, burdock is also viewed as an annoying weed across North America and Europe. Burdock roots grow straight down as far as three feet below the surface of the soil. In the middle of the summer, the burdock plan blossoms in an array of globular flowers that look very similar to thistles. These flowers contain sticky burs that cling to anyone passing by. In fact, these burs were the inspiration for the invention of Velcro. The root can be eaten as a food and in Japan, it is consumed like a regular vegetable. According to Mountain Rose Herbs, Native Americans were also “known to use the whole plant as food, boiling the root in maple syrup (which made it like candy) so that it could be stored for longer periods of time.

Burdock root is mildly bitter and stimulates the release of gastric juices which aids in digestion. In addition to aiding in digestion, burdock has also been traditionally used to help sooth the skin. There have been animal studies that show that this herb may help support the liver. Burdock contains potent antioxidants and traditional herbal medicine often uses burdock as a blood purifier.

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I just love what herbs can do. Don’t you? 

If you’re interested in learning more about herbs, check out my affiliate partner, Mountain Rose Herbs. High-quality, superior herbs. My go-to source.

This “coffee” tastes great hot, iced, or frozen. Feel free to experiment, but here are my tips:

  • I love mine with coconut oil, a couple drops of stevia, a dash of sea salt, and coconut cream.
  • If you’re making it hot, use your immersion blender. It makes it super frothy and creamy and, if you add coconut oil, you don’t end up with an oil slick on the top.
  • If you want to make it iced, I recommend using your immersion blender or regular blender to blend everything together and then pour it over your ice.
  • If you want to make it frozen, just toss all your ingredients into your blender and add ice to suit your taste.
  • This makes a super strong “coffee” so feel free to adjust the serving size depending on your tastes. Each serving size is roughly 1 cup.
5.0 from 1 reviews
Love Your Liver Herbal Coffee
 
Prep time
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I have linked to the products from my affiliate partners that I personally use and recommend. All funds earned go to help support the maintenance of this site and free content. Thank you! :)
Author:
Serves: 8
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. If you're using whole herbs, use a coffee grinder to grind into a fine powder.
  2. Bring your filtered water to a boil.
  3. Add in your ground herbs, cover, and reduce heat to low.
  4. Simmer for 20 minutes and then turn off heat.
  5. Let coffee cool to room temperature.
  6. Strain off herbs (don't forget to compost if you are able!).
  7. Store in fridge for up to 2 weeks.
  8. Each serving is approximately 1 cup. Tastes great hot, iced, or frozen with your choice of sweeteners, flavors, and cream.

So tell me, have you ever used any of these herbs? What are your favorite herbs for liver support? Leave a comment below and let’s discuss!

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About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food nut, coconut everything enthusiast, avid reader and researcher, blossoming yogi, and animal lover. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

Discussion

33 comments

  1. Can’t wait to try this!

    reply 

    Marjorie
    Posted 03/28/14

  2. Im learning so much from all your articles. I look forward to your post. Thank you so much for sharing.

    reply 

    Judith Montan
    Posted 03/29/14

  3. I really enjoy the liver blend and that you are presenting information for people to wean off the coffee.

    The one point I would make and that many commercial products of Milk Thistle claim for liver health, is only possible if you are using a Standardized Extract of the Silymarin, as you quoted. Most if not all do not have a standardized extract or if they do it is not at the 300 plus milligrams a day.

    To just have Milk Thistle tea or eating it is more for fiber but will not actually increase and regenerate your Kupher Cells (Liver Cells) so again by eating it you will get the fiber but not the liver enhancement.

    The same can be said of the Ginkgo products on the market – Just drinking Gingko tea will not make you smarter – I still enjoy the tea but we need to be real about what is happeninging in the physiology of the body. That is not to say there is a mind-body occurance as well.

    In Health –

    Dr. Moses Goldberg

    reply 

    Dr. Moses Goldberg
    Posted 03/31/14

    • Hi Dr. Moses – Thanks for stopping by and sharing that insight! There is always more to learn when it comes to herbs and health! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/01/14

    • Dr. Moses, if drinking the milk thistle tea won’t help regenerate liver cells, is there an alternate way to consume it that will? Are there other natural herbs that do promote liver cell regeneration?

      One of my major concerns is that for years I have overmedicated myself with OTC medications for pain and I now want to reverse the damage I may have done.

      Thank you.

      reply 

      Eric
      Posted 04/03/14

  4. I love the sound of this herbal coffee! Brilliant idea. Will try this tomorrow morning :)

    reply 

    Anna
    Posted 03/31/14

  5. I am very excited to try this tea blend. I was shocked though when I saw the shipping charges at MountainRose Herbs. Know any coupon codes that will ease the shipping cost?

    reply 

    Karla
    Posted 04/02/14

    • Hi Karla – I don’t know if they run any shipping specials. You could email them and ask. I do agree that their shipping is a little high, but I am willing to pay it b/c their herbs are the best quality of any I’ve tried.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/02/14

  6. This sounds amazing.
    I used to love Dandelion & Burdock fizzy drink (soda) when I was a kid in England. But unfortunately they are full of sugar, preservatives and colourings these days.

    Can’t wait to try this – thanks so much!

    reply 

    Louise
    Posted 04/02/14

  7. Just wondering, as I don’t have a coffee grinder, is there any chance your friends at Mountain Rose Herbs might grind up and sell a pre-mixed packet of the herbs needed? And let us know how much to use to complete your recipe?

    Just thought I’d ask!

    Cheers!

    reply 

    Louise
    Posted 04/02/14

    • Hi Louise – You can buy all of the herbs ground individually from Mountain Rose Herbs (and other places as well), but this specific mixture is my own creation. MRH does not do custom orders, so you would need to purchase each herb individually and then combine them at home. I know Mountain Rose Herbs does carry an herbal coffee blend, but it’s different from mine. I am actually going to be selling a line of herbal blends, but it requires some specific licencing and commercial kitchen preparation which I have not had time to finalize yet. I will make an announcement once that is up and running.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/02/14

    • Just tried this coffee minus the dandelion root (I had everything in the pot then realized the jar was empty!) It is great.
      You can buy most herbs at Mountain Rose Herbs powdered.
      Pam

      reply 

      Pam
      Posted 04/08/14

      • Hi Pam – Great! So glad you liked it! One suggesting is that if you want to buy the herbs already ground, buy smaller quantities, as ground herbs have less of a “shelf life” than the whole herbs.

        reply 

        Jessica Espinoza
        Posted 04/09/14

  8. Hi, how often would it be ok to drink this coffee? Thanks.

    reply 

    Missy
    Posted 04/02/14

    • Hi Missy – I drink a cup of it almost every day. I would start of with a small amount and see if you notice anything. Herbs affect people differently, so while I have no issues with this, someone else might be sensitive. These are all GRAS (generally regarded as safe) herbs though.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/02/14

  9. I bought a coffee grinder for $10 at my local store. When buying from Mountain Rose I always wait until I have a large order and order at once. You can also get a group of people together to place orders. They have bulk discounts with a percentage off depending on how many pounds your entire order is. I have never seen a coupon for them. I buy from them because they are local (semi) and I like their quality and variety of products.

    I can’t wait to try this. Thanks for the recipe!

    reply 

    Tina
    Posted 04/02/14

    • Tina – Great tips! I sometimes will go in on order with friends or family so we can get better bulk pricing and save on shipping. I completely forgot to mention that. I did some shopping around for coffee grinders earlier and there are many cost effective options for $10 to $12. It is totally worth the investment, as whole herbs and spices will last much longer than ground, so you probably will save money in the long-run. Hope you enjoy the recipe! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/03/14

  10. Or, you could drink Teecchino.it has the dandelion and chicory root. Not sure about the other two since I dont have my pkg here. I love it with coconut milk and almond milk.

    reply 

    Julie
    Posted 04/09/14

    • Hi Julie – Most of the Teechino varieties contain barley, which has gluten and I can’t have gluten. They do have some barley free varieties, but honestly, I am not a fan of the taste of their products. I much prefer to make my own at home. I grind all of my own herbs so I am getting a much fresher and much more medicinal product than buying pre-made versions. Cheers!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/09/14

  11. I love this brew! It tastes wonderful and I appreciate the liver support. Thanks for such a detailed recipe with great printability!

    reply 

    Wren
    Posted 05/08/14

  12. Hi Jessica, your recipe sounds delicious, will have to try it. Currently I have been creating my own brew with equal amounts of chicory root, dandelion root, roasted carob, and maca powder. I do enjoy the earthy flavor of chicory and dandelion; I spice things up with local raw honey, coconut cream, and a dash of Ceylon cinnamon!

    reply 

    Sharon
    Posted 07/10/14

    • Hi Sharon – This is one of my favorite drinks now. I keep a batch on hand in the fridge at all times. I am going to get some carob this weekend and add it to the mix. I love the taste of carob. Great idea! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/10/14

  13. Have not tried yet but sounds delicious. tho i do love my caffeine

    reply 

    xotchil danio
    Posted 07/10/14

  14. Hi I’ve been trying to remove coffee as I attempt to heal my gut too. I would like to try this out but I’m wondering if you know whether these herbs are safe while nursing. Thanks

    reply 

    elizabeth
    Posted 07/11/14

    • Hi Elizabeth – I personally would recommend talking to your naturopath or a clinical herbalist about that, since I am not a trained medical professional. As with all herbs, reactions will vary from person to person, so it’s best to always speak to a professional, especially in the case of being pregnant or nursing. Thanks for stopping by! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/13/14

  15. I just went out and bought all these ingredients! Can’t wait to make it in the am! :)

    reply 

    Rachel Orie
    Posted 08/03/14

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