4 DIY Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blends

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4 DIY Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blends | deliciousobsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest

Over the last year, I have been doing a lot of experimenting and research on herbs. I have found the teas are the best way for me to get my herbs into my body. I love herbal tea and drink a lot of it every day, so it makes it a lot easier when I can tailor my teas to my own needs and tastes. Here are four adaptogenic herbal tea blends that I drink regularly. I tend to get bored drinking the same thing every day, so I mix it up and alternate between these teas and some other varieties I have developed.

If you’re new to adaptogens and want to learn more, check out my posts on the subject. I am adding to these regularly as well. Here are some of the most popular posts:

Tea recipes are super flexible, and nothing is set in stone. Feel free to experiment to suit your own personal tastes. You may find that you like a little more of one thing and a little less of something else. My friend, who is also a certified clinical herbalist, said that you need roughly 1/2 cup of dried herbs per quart of water, so that gives you a good starting place if you decide to start creating your own tea blends. There are a few herbs that I often add to the teas I make and I consider them sort of “standard” herbs to help round out the tea. Some of those include:

  • Rosehips: I add these to everything! They are a superfruit, high in Vitamins A, C, D, E, flavonoids, lycopene, and iron, along with antioxidants. Rosehips have anti-inflammatory properties and may be used to support healthy joints.
  • Elderberries: Commonly used as a cold and flu remedy due to immune-boosting properties, elderberries give teas a wonderfully sweet and tart berry flavor. Very high in vitamin C and antioxidants.
  • Barberries: Typically used as a food in Middle Eastern cooking, but the reason I use them is for their super high vitamin C content and they add a little fruity flavor to teas.
  • Nettles: Very common addition to herbal tea blends. It high in minerals including iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium. Supports the urinary tract.
  • Lemon Balm: This herb has been shown to help support a healthy gastrointestinal tract, as well as memory and cognitive function. It has also been shown to help promote calmness.
  • Red Raspberry Leaf: A very pleasant tasting herb that is often used as a stabilizer in herbal tonics. Especially good for women in that it helps support a healthy reproductive system from toning the uterus, reducing PMS, and supporting a healthy pregnancy. High in vitamin C, potassium, magnesium, and iron.
  • Hibiscus: A very common “filler” herb for tea blends. Hibiscus adds a rich red color and mild flavor. High in antioxidants.

Basic Herbal Preparations

If you’re new to herbs and are feeling confused about all the different preparations for them, don’t be! Let me help you out with this Basic Herbal Preparations post. You can also watch the videos below to learn more about a couple herbal preparations and about my favorite source for organic, sustainably harvested herbs.

Delicious Obsessions Trusted Product Recommendations

I get a lot of questions asking where I get my rooibos and other herbal products. Due to the FDA and FTC laws regarding health claims, I can’t list a specific product or brand here. For a list of herbal products, please visit my Products I Love page.

For each of these teas, I go back and forth between decoctions and infusions. Decoctions are typically better when there are roots and berries, but it really does depend on how much time you have and what you feel like doing. I tend to get really distracted, so often, leaving something simmering on the stove for an extended period of time is not a good idea for me! 😉 Learn how to make infusions and decoctions here. Each batch will make a quart of very strong tea concentrate, that you can then add additional water to suit your tastes. I usually do half concentrate and half fresh water.

How to Brew Your Adaptogenic Teas (decoction)

  1. Heat 1 quart of filtered water to boiling and add the herbs.
  2. Let herbs simmer for 15-20 minutes and then turn off the heat. You can strain them at this time, or you can let them sit longer (up to a few hours). The longer they sit, the stronger tasting and more medicinal the tea will be.
  3. Strain off the herbs and store the finished tea in fridge. Compost your herbs if you can!
  4. This makes a really concentrated tea, so you can add some extra water before serving, depending on your tastes. Also tastes great with a splash of lemon or lime juice (lime is my favorite).

How to Brew Your Adaptogenic Teas (infusion)

  1. Place your herbs in a jar or pitcher (as long as they are heat tolerant). I typically use my large 1 quart Pyrex glass measuring cup so that I don’t risk cracking a jar or pitcher and wasting my herbs.
  2. Heat 1 quart of filtered water to boiling and pour over the herbs.
  3. Let herbs steep for 20-30 minutes. You can strain them at this time, or you can let them sit longer (up to a few hours). The longer they sit, the stronger tasting and more medicinal the tea will be.
  4. Strain off the herbs and store in the finished tea in fridge. Compost your herbs if you can!

4 DIY Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blends

Adaptogenic-Tea-Recipe-1-2 Follow Me on Pinterest Adaptogenic herbal tea with rosehips, elderberries, amla, nettles, hibiscus, and lemon balm

Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blend with Amla

Makes 1 quart

  • 2 tbsp. rosehips
  • 2 tbsp. amla
  • 1 tbsp. elderberries
  • 1 tbsp. nettles
  • 1 tbsp. hibiscus
  • 1 tbsp. lemon balm
  • 1 tbsp. dried stevia leaf (optional)

DIY Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blends | deliciousobsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest  Adaptogenic herbal tea with schisandra, astragalus, barberries, amla, nettles, rosehips, and red raspberry leaf

 Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blend with Schisandra, Amla, and Astragalus

Makes 1 quart

  • 1 tbsp. Schisandra Berries
  • 1 tbsp. Amla
  • 1 tbsp. Barberries
  • 1 tbsp. Rosehips
  • 1 tbsp. Hibiscus
  • 1 tbsp. Red Raspberry Leaf
  • 1/2 tbsp. Nettles
  • 1 tsp. Astragalus (mine is powdered – if you have the whole root, add about 2-3x as much)
  • 1/2 tbsp. Dried Orange or Lemon Peel (optional)
  • 1 tbsp. dried stevia leaf (optional)

DIY Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blends | deliciousobsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest Adaptogenic herbal tea with eleuthero, elderberries, amla, shatavari, nettles, and ginger 

Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blend with Eleuthero, Shatavari, and Amla

Makes 1 quart

  • 2 tbsp. Elderberries
  • 1 tbsp. Eleuthero
  • 1 tbsp. Shatavari
  • 1 tbsp. Amla
  • 1 tbsp. Nettles
  • 1 tbsp. Ginger
  • 1/2 tbsp. Lemon peel (optional)
  • 1 tbsp. dried stevia leaf (optional)

DIY Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blends | deliciousobsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest Adaptogenic herbal tea with schisandra, elderberries, holy basil, nettles, and cinnamon

Adaptogenic Herbal Tea Blend With Schisandra and Holy Basil

Makes 1 quart

  • 2 tbsp. Schisandra berries
  • 2 tbsp. Holy Basil
  • 2 tbsp. Elderberries
  • 1 tbsp. Rosehips
  • 1 tbsp. Nettles
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 tbsp. dried stevia leaf (optional)

Further Reading

If you are looking for more info on adaptogenic herbs, I HIGHLY recommend this book, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief. It is one of my all-time favorite herb books and probably the one I reference the most. Find it on Amazon here.

Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief | DeliciousObsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest

What is your favorite type of tea? Do you have a favorite adaptogen? Leave a comment below!

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About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food wellness educator and the founder of the Delicious Obsessions website. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. She began helping her mother cook and bake around the age of three and she's been in the kitchen ever since, including working in a restaurant in her hometown for almost a decade, where she worked every position before finally becoming the lead chef. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

Discussion

23 comments

  1. Are these safe to use with children? And can I use the herbs more than once? I wasn’t sure if you meant store the used herbs or the finished tea in the fridge. Thanks!

    reply 

    Melissa
    Posted 09/16/13

    • Hi Melissa – It’s always best to consult with a trained herbalist regarding herbs and children. Sometimes you can re-use herbs when they are berries and roots, but for these recipes, I don’t recommend it, as the flavor will be very, very weak. You will store the finished tea in the fridge. Once you’re done brewing, just strain off the herbs and toss them in the compost pile (if you have one). Hope that helps! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 09/17/13

  2. When I make tea in a 2 qt. glass pitcher,(or a 1 qt. canning jar) I put a silver knife, handle side down in the container before I pour in the boiling water. You can remove the knife when it cools a little, before you put it in the fridge.

    reply 

    auntiemaryann
    Posted 09/23/13

  3. How long will the tea last in the fridge.

    reply 

    Kas
    Posted 10/09/13

    • It should last for 4-5 days. Just go by smell. One of my dear friends is an herbalist and she said that you absolutely will know when an infusion goes bad. There is no mistaking the smell. Enjoy!

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 10/09/13

  4. I sure hope that you meant to write “flu” and not”fly” in describing the benefits of elderberries !!!!

    reply 

    Suzanne
    Posted 10/10/13

    • HAHA! Yes, I certainly did. Thank you for catching that! In all the times I’ve read this post, I missed it! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 10/10/13

  5. I am a hot tea drinker, would you simply add the concentrate to just boiled water?

    Great information, thank you. I’m really looking forward to making these teas 🙂

    reply 

    Shannon
    Posted 12/11/13

    • Hi Shannon – Regardless if you drink it cold or hot, you will follow the infusion method outlined in this post. This will ensure the major constituents of the herbs are extracted. Once your infusion is brewed, you can enjoy it hot or cold.

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 12/11/13

  6. Are all of these ok to drink while pregnant and nursing?

    reply 

    Samantha
    Posted 12/14/13

    • Hi Samantha – I would recommend consulting with your doctor, naturopath, or herbalist. Some herbs are not safe during pregnancy, so you need to find out what your practitioner recommends for you.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 12/14/13

  7. Hi Jessica! Are any/all of these safe while nursing? Mama needs some adrenal support 😉

    reply 

    Renee Kohley
    Posted 03/28/14

    • Hi Renee – I would check with an herbalist or an ND to make sure. I am not well-versed on herbs that are tolerated during pregnancy / nursing and definitely don’t want to give you an bad advice! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 03/29/14

  8. You might want to take the word “in” out of steps 3 and 4 respectively so it doesn’t look like you should put the herbs back into the tea before you store it in the fridge.

    reply 

    Joan Smith
    Posted 04/12/14

    • Thanks for catching that Joan! Amazing how my eyes just glaze over things sometimes! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/15/14

  9. I use Licorice Root cut and sifted as an adaptive for adrenals. I would like to make it taste better any ideas?

    reply 

    Mo
    Posted 01/03/15

    • Hi Mo – Licorice root can be a little strong on its own. Try blending it with some other herbs like nettle or raspberry leaf. Tulsi (Holy Basil) is another one that would go well with licorice.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 01/04/15

  10. I Love rose hips for swelling, Holy basil lowers cortisol dramatically, (can be good or bad depending on your levels) & lemon balm can lower thyroid hormone, just an FYI.

    reply 

    kathleen
    Posted 04/21/15

    • Great tips Kathleen! Thanks for sharing! As I always say, not every herb is suitable for every person. It definitely takes some experimenting! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/22/15

  11. Hi! I am in the process of making these teas and I think I ordered the wrong Amla. Mine is whole. WHat do I do with that? Also, MRH has three kinds of it…what should I have ordered?

    reply 

    Heather
    Posted 05/12/15

    • Hi Heather – I always got the powdered amla or the dehydrated amla from MRH. You can use it whole in the tea, or if you have a spice grinder or blender, you could whiz it up in there to make a powder. 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/13/15

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