Homemade Non-Toxic Coconut Oil Sunscreen Recipe

Like this Post? Please Share the Love!
Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on YummlyTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this page
This post may contain affiliate links. It does not cost you anything and helps maintain the free information on this site, as well as answer the questions of “what brand do you use?” Please know I never personally recommend any product or service I wouldn’t use on my own family.

The Detox Project: Find Out Why Detoxification is Critical to Your Health.

Homemade Non-Toxic Coconut Oil Sunscreen Recipe | DeliciousObsessions.com Follow Me on Pinterest

Recently, my recipe for non-toxic coconut oil sunscreen was featured on Health Impact News and CoconutOil.com. I wanted to also share it with you guys over here too!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

When it comes to sun protection, would you be shocked if I said that I don’t use sunscreen? I haven’t for years. The main reason for stopping use of commercial sunscreen was because I was deficient in Vitamin D and was striving to get more sun on my skin in order to help boost my levels. Vitamin D deficiency has been proven to create a host of health problems, including increased risk of cancer. That is not to say that I go outside and lay in the sun, unprotected for hours. I am still cautious about my sun exposure and if I know I am going to be outdoors for a long stretch of time, I am careful to cover up with long-sleeve shirts, hats, pants, etc.

UVA versus UVB Rays

Too much sun exposure can damage the skin, and frequent burns can increase the risk of skin cancer, premature aging, wrinkles, and more. That said, we have all been programmed to fear sun exposure of any sort and that really is a shame. We need to enjoy the sun, we just have to be smart about it.

There are many different types of rays that the sun produces, but the two main rays that we are concerned with are the Ultraviolet A (UVA) and Ultraviolet B (UVB) rays. The UVB rays are the good guys – they are the ones that stimulate the Vitamin D production in our skin. UVA rays are the ones that are the primary risk factor for cancer. Experts believe that the optimal amount of sun exposure (and in turn Vitamin D production) each person needs is when their skin turns the slightest shade of pink. Of course, this depends on your skin color, but any exposure after that will not yield more vitamin D, as your body can only create so much in any one day. Once you start turning pink, you are also increasing your risk for a more severe burn. Sunscreens also offer a false sense of protection, as many on the market do not screen for the UVA rays, but do screen for UVB, which makes no sense at all considering UVB are the rays required for Vitamin D production.

UVB rays are at their peak around noon, and they are more easily filtered in overcast and cloudy weather. UVA rays are not filtered as well, so even when it’s cloudy outside, these rays are still shining through. Also, UVB rays are not as strong early and late in the day, but UVA rays are. Something to keep in mind if you enjoy your outdoor activities early in the morning or in the evening.

Reducing Chemical Exposure

A side benefit of my move to avoid commercial sunscreens was that I stopped exposing my skin to toxic chemicals used in sunscreens, several of which are endocrine system disruptors, increase the risk of cancer, and more. Remember, our skin is our largest organ, and what we put on it gets absorbed into our body. Since I strive to live as naturally as possible and avoid as many toxins as I can, this was a welcome “side effect” of stopping my use of sunscreen.

It’s an ironic situation that in order to protect our skin from cancer, we started using sunscreen, but studies are now finding that using sunscreen may lead to an increased risk of cancer. This is due to a variety of reasons, including the fact that many sunscreens only block UVB rays (the good ones), and not UVA (the bad ones), creating a Vitamin D deficiency. Also, research is pointing to the fact that the Vitamin A and its derivatives that are used in many sunscreens turn toxic when exposed to the sun.

The Role of a Real Food Diet and Natural Oils as Sunscreen

No one can refute the fact that diet plays a critical role in the health of our skin. The old adage “you are what you eat” rings true. You only get out of your body what you put into it, so choose your fuel wisely. I have no doubt in my mind that my high consumption of saturated fats like coconut oil and ghee play a huge role in sun protection and the overall health of my skin. In fact, I think my diet plays one of the most important roles in my skin health and sun tolerance of anything I do. Overconsumption of polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs), like soybean, canola, and other vegetable oils, can leave our entire body, including our skin, unhealthy and at risk for a variety of health problems. When I started focusing on a whole food diet with plenty of saturated fats, I found that the health of my skin dramatically improved. I also find that I do not burn nearly as easy as I used to, even when I end up being outside a tad longer than I should have been.

Not only do I use coconut oil as my primary cooking oil, but I have also used coconut oil on my skin for years. I had heard a long time ago that coconut oil had some natural SPF properties and since I already used it for skin health, that was just an added bonus. When you start researching, many carrier oils have natural SPF. SPF stands for “Sun Protection Factor”. SPF is mainly a measure of UVB protection and ranges anywhere from 1 to 45 or more. According to Anthony J. O’Lenick, author of “Oils of Nature”, raspberry seed oil has a natural SPF of 28-50 and carrot seed oil has a natural SPF of 38-40. Other oils, like coconut oil, wheat germ oil, jojoba oil, sesame, etc. will all have lower SPF levels, ranging from 4-10. That said, none of these oils are going to give us 100% protection from UV rays (and keep in mind that they primarily block UVB rays), so you still must use common sense when using natural oils as a sunscreen.

To boost the sunscreen to more of a full-spectrum sunscreen, you can add zinc oxide to the mix. Zinc oxide is a very common ingredient in sunscreens, makeup, and other skin care products and it does help protect against both UVA and UVB rays. All that said, there is no way to really know the true SPF of this sunscreen, so always enjoy your sun time carefully. If you choose to use zinc oxide, there are a few important things to note:

  1. Look for a high-quality zinc oxide that is specifically for cosmetic applications.
  2. Make sure it is uncoated and not micronized or classified as a nano-particle (nano-particles can be absorbed into the bloodstream, which can create health problems).
  3. It will sit on the skin, so depending on how much you use, it may leave a whitish hue.
  4. Use caution when measuring and mixing it, as to not inhale the powder. Some people will use a dust mask to ensure they don’t inhale the powder.

This recipe for homemade coconut oil sunscreen uses a variety of oils and the end product is more of a body butter.  It is safe for the whole family, though you want to make sure children do not ingest any of it. The beeswax will help it be slightly water-repellent. When not in use, store the mixture in the fridge to help extend the shelf-life. You can use whatever essential oils you would like for scent, but make sure to stay away from phototoxic essential oils, which includes the citrus family and a few others. When these essential oils are exposed to the sun, they can cause the skin to burn faster. If you’re not already familiar with it, the carrot seed essential oil has a natural woody, earthy scent. This is a rich body butter, so a little goes a long way.

Recipe Ingredients

I get a lot of questions on the ingredients for this recipe, so here are my notes on that:

I purchase a number of my ingredients from my affiliate partner, Vitacost, because I have found that their prices are typically $1-2 cheaper than locally. Plus, I usually have a big enough order to get free shipping, so I save even more. If you are interested, you can sign up through this link to get a $10 off coupon to use on your next Vitacost purchase (I get one too, so thanks!).

Amazon, of course, has everything you need for this recipe. Their prices are often very good, though I love to shop around and sometimes find that Vitacost and Thrive Market have better deals. If you like saving money, it’s good to shop around! 🙂

My affiliate partner Tropical Traditions is where I get all of my coconut products come from.

I buy all of my cosmetic butters and waxes from Mountain Rose Herbs (an affiliate partner). Their quality is outstanding and while I may try other brands every once in awhile, I keep coming back to them.

I have also linked to specific products within the recipe below.

For more information about the essential oils I use for myself and my family, click here.

Phototoxicity Note

Some people have asked me about citrus oils and phototoxicity. Some citrus essential oils are known to be phototoxic, meaning they can cause burning of the skin when exposed to the sun. According to essential oil expert,Tiffany Rowan, Mandarin, Sweet Orange, Tangelo, and Tangerine are not phototoxic, but caution should be exercised anyway for those with sensitive skin. If you use citrus oils in this recipe, I would recommend sticking with the 4 listed above and always test a small patch on your skin to check for reactions.

CARROT SEED OIL NOTE

This ingredient causes a lot of confusion.  There is Carrot Seed Essential Oil and there is Carrot Seed Oil. There is a difference in that one is an essential oil (SUPER SUPER concentrated) and one is carrier oil. Totally different products and uses for it. Carrot seed essential oil is a volatile oil (meaning quick evaporation in this case) and should only be used in very small concentrations on the skin. It is my understanding from my research that you do not want to use carrot seed essential oil for sunscreens because of the amount you would need. Because of this confusion, I am now recommending that people just omit this ingredient unless they are 100% certain they are using the correct product. THIS IS THE CARROT SEED OIL THAT I RECOMMEND.

Read the full article here or here.

Sources:

Learn more about skin care from my videos!

Since I am a fanatic about keeping my skin and body care non-toxic, I get a lot of questions about what my routine is and what products I use. I created this video to discuss all of that and more. The video below that features a lot of the hair care products that I use, including henna and my favorite clean shampoo.

Paid Endorsement Disclosure: Delicious Obsessions is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to AMAZON.COM. This post may contain affiliate links and/or ads. We only recommend products or services that we have personally tried and love. When you make a purchase through any of these links, we earn a small commission on each sale, which allows us to cover a portion of the cost of this site. This has no effect on your sale price and is simply a cost of doing business for the company you are purchasing from. All funds received help with the continued maintenance of this website and free content. You can view it like leaving a tip. Thank you! Read our full terms and conditions here.


Real Food 101: Practical Tips for Healthy Eating - Get your Free copy today!

Like this Post? Please Share the Love!
Share on FacebookPin on PinterestShare on YummlyTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+Share on StumbleUponEmail this to someonePrint this page

About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food wellness educator and the founder of the Delicious Obsessions website. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. She began helping her mother cook and bake around the age of three and she's been in the kitchen ever since, including working in a restaurant in her hometown for almost a decade, where she worked every position before finally becoming the lead chef. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

Discussion

103 comments

  1. Fabulous article! Thank you for the recipe. I have been wanting to try my own, but wasn’t sure about the resulting SPF. Now to get some raspberry seed and carrot seed oil.

    reply 
    • Hi Kristina – Thanks for stopping by! Hope you enjoy! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 06/13/13

  2. Great article! And I think I have all the ingredients except the carrot seed extract. I haven’t used a tanning bed in many moons, but we had a really long rainy season one winter and I considered using a tanning bed b/c I caught a cold and wanted some vitamin D, and a friend of mine owns a salon. I researched her bulbs, however, because they are “bronzing bulbs.” These block the UVB, which is needed WITH the UVA. Without UVB, the UVA is especially damaging. What a crazy culture we have! I imagine that 100 years from now they will talk about how stupid we were, exchanging a temporary tan for skin cancer. If you tan in a bed, make sure the bulbs are full spectrum.

    reply 

    Anne LaBelle
    Posted 06/13/13

    • Great point on the tanning beds! I know Mercola has some good articles on his site on what to look for if you use the beds. Yes, 100 years from now, people will look back and shake their heads at how backwards things were … hopefully!

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 06/13/13

  3. I started using coconut oil for cooking, then learned about using it for facial cleansing and started doing that. Then I learned I could use it as a body moisturizer and tried that. I haven’t noticed ill effects from cooking with it or applying it to my face as a cleanser or spot moisturizer (under eyes, on lips), but with the first application to my neck I developed a rashy spot and when applied to the rest of my body I break out in light hives (thankfully none on my face or hands!). Do you know of anyone else with such sensitivity to the oil on their body but none on the face/hands or when eating it? I’ve eaten coconut meat and used coconut milk and water – including straight out of the nut itself – for years and never had a reaction, so i would think I’m not allergic, but most of my skin seems to be indicating otherwise. I suppose I should get allergy tested for it to make sure it’s okay for me to use at all. I will be so disappointed if I have to stop using it. There are other options, but coconut oil and milk are my favs.

    reply 

    Tamara
    Posted 06/21/13

    • Hi Tamara – I know there are people who are allergic to coconut, but it seems to be rather uncommon. Have you tried a variety of different brands with the same effect? I’d definitely ask your doctor about it! We are all so unique, that you just never know what we’ll react to! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 06/21/13

      • Thanks for the quick reply Jessica! I haven’t tried other brands. That’s a great idea! I’ll do that before I talk with my doctor so I can let her know if it happens with several or just this one brand. Thanks again! Love your blog!

        reply 

        Tamara
        Posted 06/21/13

        • Good luck and thanks for your readership! 🙂

          reply 

          Jessica
          Posted 06/23/13

    • Hi, when I started using the coconut oil on my face, I would get a little rash on the bottom part of my face, so I would use it on and off. Then one day I decided to mix Aloe Vera 100% gel with it and it solved the rash problem.

      reply 

      Zully
      Posted 07/09/13

      • Great tip! I’ve never had that issue, but I’m sure it will help others! Thanks for sharing!

        reply 

        Jessica
        Posted 07/10/13

      • Thanks for the tip Zully. I’ll give that a try.

        reply 

        Tamara
        Posted 07/11/13

    • Every once is a while I notice my neck and upper chest will get lite hives. I started rinsing extra with the washcloth and have stopped with the hives. It is amazing on my face. Everyone says I look younger now. The only other thing we can not use it for is shaving. My daughter and I broke out in a bad rash when we used it for a shaving oil. We also love it with cooking.

      reply 

      Debbie
      Posted 05/16/14

    • I have that exact reaction. Most of face okay. Itchy on body. Internal use fine. I will try the aloe vera tip. I have the MTHFR genetic mutation. Have you been checked?

      reply 

      Sage
      Posted 05/04/15

  4. Hi- this looks like a great recipe for sunscreen & I’m excited to give it a try. I looked at Mountain Rose Herbs for the carrot seed & raspberry seed essential oils but they don’t have the raspberry. Do you know where you purchased it? Thanks!

    reply 

    angie
    Posted 07/16/13

    • Hi Angie – The Raspberry Seed Oil I think I found on Amazon. There are also some other companies that sell it (cosmetic supply companies), but it was a little harder to find than all the other ingredients. Enjoy! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 07/16/13

  5. This is awesome! I can’t wait to try your coconut oil sunscreen recipe at home. Our site also has a similar article about coconut oil as an effective sunscreen. Your readers will surely benefit from it.

    reply 

    Chelsea Mason
    Posted 03/04/14

  6. Hi, I noticed you put the Zinc oxide ingredient as optional, I was wondering if it makes sense to make that the optional ingredient since that is what is providing the sun protection, otherwise it’s just a moisturizer recipe.

    reply 

    Emma
    Posted 04/01/14

    • Hi Emma – The reason I put it as optional is because there are mixed feelings about using zinc oxide. Some say yay, some say nay. It does provide another layer of protection. I do recommend keeping this mixture in the fridge if you are not going to use it up quickly to help preserve the quality of the oils, which I do mention in the instructions. Each person is going to be different as to their sun protection needs. Some may need more, some may need less. This is just one idea for a non-toxic sunscreen, but is certainly not the be all end all for sun protection options. Cheers!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/01/14

      • where can we order the best cosmetic quality zinc oxide? The stuff I got last year in a tube was like shortening!
        kate

        reply 

        Kate
        Posted 05/07/14

  7. In my last comment I did not address the natural SPF of oils point, I just worry that if you only use the spf from the oils that overtime it may not be as effective due to oxidation.

    reply 

    Emma
    Posted 04/01/14

    • That’s what the Rosemary Essential Oil is for. Rosemary and many other essential oils are natural antioxidants. I use Rosemary in lieu of Vitamin A since there have been studies showing the dangers of Vitamin A for use in cosmetics.

      reply 

      Anthony
      Posted 05/15/14

  8. Coconut oil helps u get a nice tan…but for protection u need the carrot oil or sandal oil.the summer here is so bad that sandalcream i use is a blessing

    reply 

    Pratiba
    Posted 04/02/14

    • Never heard of sandal oil before. I’ll have to research that. Carrot seed oil is great and I did include that in the recipe above.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/02/14

      • I believe they mean Sandalwood Essential Oil which is known to block out the sun’s rays.

        reply 

        Anthony
        Posted 05/15/14

  9. This looks like a great recipe! I would love to make this for my daughter that has EXTREMELY sensitive skin. Do you think it is ok for sensitive skin? And also, does this particular recipe melt when it gets warm? Some days in the summer, we spend the whole day boating or out in the lake/pool.

    reply 

    Jaimie
    Posted 04/17/14

    • Hi Jaimie – Since sensitivities can vary so much from person to person, I can’t really address that. All of the oils used are safe for the skin, but I can’t say for sure if your daughter would react to any of them. Sorry! This will get pretty soft in warmer temps. I always just put it on before I go out and leave the jar at home, but I imagine it would get super soft outside all day. If you have a cooler with you, you could stick it in there. I don’t think it would completely melt, as the beeswax helps prevent that.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/17/14

  10. Is there an alternative to coconut oil? My husband is allergic. I use it in my own food but I hesitate to use it on my skin because of contact with him (you should have seen the lip balm disaster).

    reply 

    Johanna
    Posted 05/08/14

    • Hi Johanna – I am not sure of a good sub for coconut oil in this specific recipe, as the coconut oil is what offers some of the SPF protection. If I had to suggest an oil off the top of my head, I might try avocado oil. Hope that helps!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/08/14

  11. Thanks for sharing this I can’t wait to try it out!

    reply 

    Kelly
    Posted 05/08/14

  12. THANKS!

    reply 

    Theresa Schmoyer
    Posted 05/08/14

  13. Do you suppose this would be safe on a two-month-old’s skin? I want to take my daughter outside with me (I’ve got major cabin fever!), but I don’t have a lot of shade in my yard, and I feel like I can’t keep her outside for more than a few minutes at a time. That makes getting my garden planted really hard. If I could find a way to protect her skin while I work outside, I would be so excited!

    reply 

    Rebekah Eager
    Posted 05/09/14

    • Hi Rebekah – I can’t say for sure. I know many of my friends who have children and babies use homemade sunscreen on their children, but everyone is different, so I can’t say for sure in your case. From my research, there is nothing toxic about any of these ingredients, but you never know about individual sensitivities. Sorry I can’t be of more help! Maybe another reader will be able to chime in!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/09/14

  14. So, if the vitamin A and its derivatives can promote skin cancer, wouldn’t the high amount of A in the carrot and raspberry oil promote it as well?

    reply 

    Jane
    Posted 05/09/14

    • Hi Jane – Not according to my research, but I am always continuing to investigate everything. Cheers!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/09/14

  15. My kids break out really bad from zinc oxide I have heard of using neem in sunscreen could you maybe substitute

    reply 

    Amanda cox
    Posted 05/09/14

    • Hi Amanda – I have not heard that about neem, but you can definitely customize this recipe to suit your own needs! Cheers!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/09/14

  16. I would like to take my sunscreen with me on vacation. How important is the glass jar for storage? Would the sunscreen be okay stored in a plastic bottle and would it be okay in my bag on the way to the resort until I can put it in the fridge?

    reply 

    Alexandra Rosenlund
    Posted 05/10/14

    • Hi Alexandra – I think it would be fine in a plastic container. If it’s going to be very warm while you’re traveling, I’d make sure the container is in a ziploc bag, just in case it leaked. Happy travels!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/11/14

  17. IS this a very greasy sunscreen? I use coconut oil on my face but find it really greasy. When I used coconut oil on my arms as sunscreen any sand or dirt blowing in the wind stuck to my body and left me feeling really dirty. Does this sunscreen have the same effect?

    My son has a coconut sensitivity. I don’t give it to him to eat. So likely he won’t be able to use this as a sunscreen. Do you know of any other natural sunscreen recipes? I think it’s great that we can make our own.

    Thanks,

    Jane

    reply 

    jane
    Posted 05/11/14

    • Hi Jane – I find that it is a bit greasy when I first put it on, but it soaks into my skin very well and doesn’t remain greasy after it’s soaked in. Since everyone is different, I can’t really say how it would work for you. I am not sure about any other recipes, but if I find one, I’ll let you know! Coconut oil is often used in sunscreens because of its natural SPF.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/11/14

  18. Hi there, this looks great and I can’t wait to try it. Question: does it melt in warm weather? And if so, should you just go ahead and use it in its liquid/oily form? Thank you! -Lara

    reply 

    Lara Farasat
    Posted 05/13/14

    • Hi Lara – It will get pretty soft in warmer temps and if you’re outside and it’s hot, it can melt. You can definitely use it in its liquid or oily form, it may just be a tad messier to apply! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/13/14

  19. i have a question. I took this to Mexico. On the last day of my trip (after i got a base tan) i decided to try it and i got burned. Yes, i put it on every hour. it was melted when i put it on. I am wondering if perhaps I did something wrong and perhaps the zinc oxide did not mix well or evenly into the lotion. Do you have any advice in mixing it in.. so that it dissolves all the way? maybe a photo of the steps? just trying to figure out if i did something wrong.

    reply 

    julie wiegand
    Posted 05/14/14

    • Hi Julie – I really doubt that you did anything wrong, as long as you made it according to the recipe. You have to keep in mind that everyone is different, so it could be that this may not work well for your skin type and outdoor needs. The more zinc oxide you add, the more SPF it will have. It should also leave your skin faintly white, which is from the zinc. I have not burned when I use it, but I am not outdoors in the sun for long stretches of time. Usually an hour here and there throughout the day. If I am going to spend a lot of time outdoors, I may expose my skin for the first hour or so, but then I will cover up or move to the shade. Even if we’re using sunscreen, we still need to be smart about sun exposure. I’m so sorry that you had a negative experience with this! 🙁

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/15/14

    • What kind of essential oil did you use? Any citrus-type essential oil will burn the skin when exposed to sunlight.

      reply 

      Anthony
      Posted 05/15/14

      • Hi Anthony – Lavender and peppermint are my favorites, but you could use almost any kind. Certain citrus oils are phototoxic, but not all. According to essential oil expert,Tiffany Rowan, Mandarin, Sweet Orange, Tangelo, and Tangerine are not phototoxic, but caution should be exercised anyway for those with sensitive skin.

        reply 

        Jessica Espinoza
        Posted 05/16/14

  20. Your link to tiffany rowan ESSENTIAL OILS expert takes you to a porn site app.you need to fix that.she would not be happy about that!! Im friends with her and her knowledge on essential oils stems from the expert she learned it from D.Gary Young. CEO and founder of Young Living Essential Oils.His 20+years in the studying and growing his own plants seed to sealto insure no adulterated oils are key to the quality.I caution people as Tiffany does to use caution when purchasing essential oils due to 98% off them are synthetic chemicals added or just not organic 100% in compound.

    reply 

    karen natiw
    Posted 06/01/14

    • Hi Karen – I’m not sure what you were experiencing, as the link works just fine and does not go to a porn site. You’re right that we must be selective when purchasing EO’s, but I do not believe that MLMs are the only EOs that are safe. There are many options for quality EOs that are non MLM related.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/01/14

  21. Jessica, which essential oil(s) would you suggest to help deter bugs for this recipe? I don’t know much about essential oils…

    reply 

    grammyprepper
    Posted 06/01/14

  22. My 20 month old granddaughter is a red head and has VERY fair, sensitive skin. When we put sunscreen on her face her eyes get all weepy and red. We would like to give this a try but at the same time I am wondering if you have any suggestions. I will look for your reply!
    Ty, Eileen

    reply 

    eileen kowalyk
    Posted 06/03/14

    • Hi Eileen – I really can’t say one way or the other. Each person is unique, so one may be sensitive to one or more of these ingredients, while others would not. You could always try testing a very small area first, but I understand the hesitation when you are running the risk of irritating the skin and eyes.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/05/14

  23. Awesome article! I’ve been looking for a non-toxic sunscreen to share with my patients… this is by far the best one I’ve come across. Thank you!

    reply 

    Dr. Adam Kipp
    Posted 06/09/14

  24. Hey! Great article…I’ve been looking for a sunscreen recipe. I’ve already switched to homemade deodorant, etc., and this was the next thing on my list.
    The only disagreement I would offer is that there truly IS a significant difference between therapeutic grade essential oils and others. That’s not to say regular essential oils are not good, but therapeutic grade is SO much better (per research and testing). I do agree with you about the MLMs though (which is why I don’t buy any from YL).
    We have found that the best quality therapeutic grade oils actually come from a company called Heritage Essential Oils in TX. (I have no connection to them, except as a customer.) =) The quality is amazing, the prices are significantly less than YL and doTerra, and the customer service is amazing, and the shipping is super-fast.
    Thanks for the great information…keep it coming! =)

    reply 

    Rachel
    Posted 06/09/14

    • Hi Rachel – Thank you for the EO company suggestion. I will put them on my list to research.

      “Therapeutic grade” is actually nothing more than a marketing term and is not a good indicator of quality. Despite what these clever marketers would have you believe, there are no independent third party certification organization certifying essential oils as “therapeutic grade”. They don’t exist. The testing that these companies are doing are in-house and therefore are not unbiased evaluations. That is why I do not care about finding “therapeutic grade” oils. The most important things to look at are the plants that are being used, where they come from, how they are grown, and the processes used to distill the oils. Having the term “therapeutic grade” is not important. Cheers!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/11/14

  25. Is the bees wax necessary in this sunscreen? I’m extremely allergic to bees & break out in burning rashes when i come in contact with bees wax.

    reply 

    chelsea
    Posted 06/10/14

    • Hi Chelsea – The beeswax does help the texture of the sunscreen. Without it, it will melt a lot faster. There are alternatives you can use. Check into Caranuba wax or Candelilla wax.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/11/14

  26. So I just made a very similar recipe today and threw in some lemon essential oil. Do I have to scrap the batch. I’m going to cry.

    reply 

    shiloh
    Posted 06/10/14

    • Hi Shiloh – Some of the citrus oils are phototoxic. You definitely should not throw the batch out — that would be such a waste. I would just use it as a normal body butter and not as sunscreen. I would recommend perhaps testing a very small area of your skin with the mixture and see how it reacts to the sun. I know some people who have no issues with phototoxic oils, but then others who burn easily.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/11/14

  27. Thank you for the recipe, I can´t wait to try it, but I live in Mexico and can´t find raspberry seed oil, what would you use as a substitute?

    reply 

    Julie
    Posted 06/10/14

    • Hi Julie – There is no substitute for the raspberry seed oil, but you could omit it. It will reduce the SPF of the sunscreen since the raspberry seed oil has a naturally high SPF. I would recommend checking online. That is the only place I could find it.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/11/14

  28. I made this sunscreen and even after 20 minutes of mixing with my Kitchen Aid it is runny. Any thoughts on what I did wrong? Thanks!

    reply 

    Sara
    Posted 06/28/14

    • Hi Sara – Most likely your kitchen is too warm or the mixture did not cool in the fridge long enough. Stick it back in the fridge for 15 minutes or so and try again. Since it is coconut oil based, it will melt faster than other lotions.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/29/14

  29. Hi there! Love the article and recipe. I saw shared on March Against Monsanto’s Facebook page, but under a different blog. Being a blogger myself, I like to share original content with my page, so I looked for the source, but it took me through 3 scraper sites before finally reaching yours. 🙁 Wanted to let you know.

    Scraped here: http://higherperspective.com/2014/07/make-non-toxic-coconut-oil-sunscreen-guide.html
    Redirects to here: http://karmajello.com/lifestyle/lifehacks/make-non-toxic-coconut-oil-sunscreen.html
    Which redirects to here: http://www.naturalcuresnotmedicine.com/2014/06/make-non-toxic-coconut-oil-sunscreen.html
    Which redirects to you.

    Thought you should know!
    Kelly

    reply 

    Kelly Bisciotti
    Posted 07/02/14

    • Hi Kelly! Thanks for taking the time to stop by and comment. I found all of those the other day and have filed formal DMCA complaints with them. It drives me batty how people steal other people’s work! Sigh. Have a great weekend!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/04/14

  30. I have all of the ingredients except the rasberry seed oil. Can I use something in its place? Rosehip seed … Neem oil ?

    reply 

    Lynn
    Posted 07/05/14

    • Hi Lynn – There is no substitute for the red raspberry seed oil, per se, but you could just leave it out. It has a very high SPF, which is why it is used in this recipe. You are more than welcome to replace it with a different oil of your choice, though the SPF may not be as high. Hope you enjoy!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/07/14

  31. I really like this article and want to make my own sunscreen but I was wondering will this make me break out? Even at my age I still get a zit once in awhile.

    reply 

    Donna
    Posted 07/14/14

    • Hi Donna – Thanks for stopping by! I really can’t answer that, as everyone is different. I personally have never had any issues with breaking out when using this. Cheers!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/14/14

  32. I can’t wait to try this. What is the shelf life when kept in the fridge?

    reply 

    Misty
    Posted 07/14/14

  33. so I have a huge chunk..like a 2lb lump of beeswax. this recipe calls for beeswax granules..would it be safe to say that if I took like a cheese grater to my lump of beeswax and grated some off that it would be the same thing?

    reply 

    sherri
    Posted 01/31/15

    • Hi Sherri – I think in that case you need to do it by weight. I just went and weighed 2 tbsp of my beeswax granules and it weighed 0.6 ounces. Hope that helps! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 02/02/15

  34. What is the shelf life if left unrefridgerated? Anything natural that I could add to lengthen shelf life to have it unrefridgerated? My camp doesn’t have electricity, so cooling it is out of the question. I burn really easy but hate the toxicity of store bought sunscreen, I’m really looking forward to trying this recipe. 🙂

    reply 

    Nicole
    Posted 03/16/15

    • Hi Nicole – I think 3-4 months for the shelf-life if left out. I am not sure about what type of natural preservative you could add. I’ll have to do some research on that. You could make it in really small batches and then you’d use it up within that time frame. This recipe makes a pretty big batch, so you could cut it in half or even quarters if you wanted to do a smaller amount.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 03/22/15

  35. For purposes of saving time, which non-toxic, store-bought sunscreens do you recommend?

    reply 

    Court
    Posted 04/03/15

    • Hi Court – I have not purchased any sunscreen in probably a decade. I know that Dr. Mercola sells a non-toxic one on his site that would be totally safe. Sorry I can’t offer any other suggestions!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/05/15

  36. Hi Jessica! Your article is so amazing, i glad to find your site!

    reply 

    Monica Mayhem
    Posted 04/04/15

  37. Dear Ms Espinoza,

    Good work

    I’m of Indian origin – and we traditionally use cold pressed Virgin coconut oil for almost everything.

    My grandmother didn’t have any grey hairs till she passed away.

    Do spread the good word – about time we took the pose back from Procter, Gamble, Vaseline and all those despicable so-called business men

    reply 

    Pillai
    Posted 05/02/15

    • Hi Pillai – Thank you so much for your support! I appreciate you taking the time to stop by and share your thoughts! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/03/15

  38. What is the purpose of the shea butter in the recipe? Is there a substitute that could be used in its place? I am allergic to it. Thank you!

    reply 

    Tiffany F
    Posted 05/08/15

  39. You said Carrot seed oil is not the same as carrot seed essential oil. I’m trying to figure out what to get then. I have carrot seed oils from Young living but that would make it an essential oil so what do I get?

    reply 

    Maureen
    Posted 06/09/15

  40. Where do you find carrot seed oil that is NOT an essential oil? I googled to buy and could not find anything NOT an essential oil.

    reply 

    chris
    Posted 06/18/15

  41. I have been prepping for this recipe for weeks! Buying ingredients… Some got lost in shipping, but that’s all solved now. However, I bought a carrot seed oil from Native American Nutritionals. Is that considered an EO? What’s the difference? Can I still use what I purchased? Thanks!

    reply 

    Brooke
    Posted 07/21/15

    • Hi Brooke – I am guessing, since it came from NAN, that it is the essential oil. There is a difference in that one is an essential oil (SUPER SUPER concentrated) and one is carrier oil. Totally different products and uses for it. Carrot seed essential oil is a volatile oil (meaning quick evaporation in this case) and should only be used in very small concentrations on the skin. It is my understanding from my research that you do not want to use carrot seed essential oil for sunscreens because of the amount you would need. If you look above, you will see the link for the one that I recommend. I think I may do an update to this recipe since this is a very common question. 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 07/23/15

  42. Awesome natural sunscreen. Cannot wait to try it.

    First question – is there a coconut essential oil that can be used to make the lotion smell more tropical?

    Second question – do you have a recipe for regular lotion (non-sunscreen) using similar ingredients?

    Thanks!

    reply 

    Marlon
    Posted 03/12/16

  43. Hi there!

    So a few questions. I have sun sensitive skin. Crazy since I am a redhead and my body also eats through the vitamin D the sun gives me. Esh! So I need a very high SPF. Most home made creams cant cover enough to keep me safe. How much zink oxide can I safely add? And since the bug repellent came up I was wondering if the cream could pull double duty. Sunscreen/ bug repellent?

    reply 

    Miranda Cunningham
    Posted 03/30/16

    • Hi Miranda – Thanks for the comment and great questions! I have not experimented with larger amounts of the zinc oxide than what is in the recipe above. The more you add, the whiter your skin will be when you apply it. Most people don’t like that, so that is why we went with a lower amount. You are welcome to experiment with larger amounts though. As far as the bud repellent goes, that’s a great idea. I’ve never personally tried it, but will have to give it a whirl next time I make a batch and see how it turns out. I don’t see any reason why it wouldn’t work. You just want to make sure you don’t use any phototoxic oils (see note above). If you give either one a try, let me know how it goes! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/04/16

  44. Wanted to know if I can omit zinc oxide from the recipe?

    reply 

    Esther
    Posted 03/31/16

    • Hi there! Yes, you can, though it won’t give you as much full-spectrum protection. Which is totally fine, you just have to be a little more conscientious of the duration of time you have directly in the sun. Hope that helps! 🙂

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 04/04/16

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *