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How to Make Creamy Coconut Milk Yogurt (No Yogurt Maker Required)

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I have been on a serious coconut yogurt kick recently. It all started when my friend Starlene from GAPS Diet Journey sent me a little bit of the yogurt starter that she uses when she posted her great recipe for coconut milk yogurt. It was instant love from my first batch. The rich, creamy, thick, and slightly tangy, yogurt was just what I had been missing since going dairy-free in August 2012. I had always seen the coconut yogurt at the store, but they are all full of too much junk, so frankly, I had gotten used to the fact that yogurt was no longer part of my diet. But, now it’s back and I’m kicking myself for not doing this sooner! Since she sent me the starter a few weeks ago, I have made about a gazillion batches … well, not quite that many, but a lot. So much that I decided to buy a couple cases of coconut milk from my health food store!

We all know that fermented foods are beneficial to our health. After all, true health begins in the gut, and if our gut is not healthy, we are not healthy. Incorporating a wide variety of fermented foods is a great way to ensure our body is getting the beneficial bacteria that we need. There are many different strains of beneficial bacteria, which is why variety is key. I often find myself eating the same ferments over and over, and while that’s not necessarily a bad thing, there are going to be strains that I am missing. I am excited to have yogurt now, so that I can incorporate some new types back into my diet. And, my husband even likes it. As a matter of fact, he loves it and told me to make sure I mentioned that he gives it a glowing review! Thanks babe! :)

What Do You Need? Cultures, Thickeners, and More.

So, I received these cultures from Starlene and then proceeded to try to figure out how to make coconut milk yogurt. The main dilemma that I faced was that I don’t have a yogurt maker. Nor do I have a dehydrator, so my options for keeping the yogurt incubated were slim. I found a few crockpot recipes around the Web, but was not too keen on those either. So, I started experimenting and I have finally found what works for me — my oven. I can’t guarantee this method will work for everyone else, but hopefully it will spark a little inspiration for you to play around and see what works for you. My “recipe” is a combination of Starlene’s recipe and the recipe from my affiliate partner, Cultures for Health.

You will need a thickening agent for your coconut milk yogurt, and I like to use gelatin for that. Gelatin is very nutritious and healing to the gut, so this is a great way to get a little more into your diet. I have never used anything other than gelatin, but according to the recipe from Cultures for Health, you could also use tapioca starch/flour.

When it comes to yogurt starters, there are a lot to choose from. Yogurt starters are broken down into two categories: Thermophilic (heated) and Mesophilic (non-heated). For this recipe, I use a thermophilic starter, since I heat the coconut milk up and incubate it at a warmer temperature (108 – 110 °F). I have not yet played with making a mesophilic-style yogurts.

Also, when looking at yogurt cultures, you will probably see the terms “direct-set” and “reusable” used. Direct set cultures are a one time use only culture. This is what we will be using for this recipe. Reusable cultures are where you can take a small amount from a previous batch of yogurt (that uses a reusable starter) to make your new batch. If taken care of, these reusable cultures can be used indefinitely.

What strains of bacteria are in these cultures? The GI Pro Start, which is what I use, contains:

  • Lactobacillus bulgaricus
  • Streptococcus thermophilus
  • Lactobacillus casei

The vegan direct set culture from my affiliate partner, Cultures for Health, contains:

  • Bifidobacterium bifidum
  • Lactobacillus acidophilus
  • Lactobacillus casei
  • Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp bulgaricus
  • Lactobacillus rhamnosus
  • Streptococcus thermophilus

The GI Pro Start site says that for nut milks, you often have to increase the amount of starter and also play with the fermentation time. They recommend 1/2 tsp. or more of the starter per quart of nut or non-dairy milk. I experimented with the amount of starter culture and found that 1/4 tsp. gives me a yogurt that I like best. This yogurt does not get super tart. It stays pleasantly tangy, which is nice if you have eaters with sensitive palates. The texture will depend on how much gelatin you use. If you use a full 2 tbsp., you will end up with a super thick Greek-style yogurt. As you lessen the gelatin, you will get a softer, thinner yogurt. My favorite consistency is right around 1 tbsp. of gelatin, but, depending on what my plans are for the yogurt, I make it thinner or thicker.

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I’d love to hear from you! Do you make your own yogurt without a yogurt maker? What have you found that works? What’s your favorite starter? Let’s start the discussion below!


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About Jessica Espinoza

Jessica is a real food nut, coconut everything enthusiast, avid reader and researcher, blossoming yogi, and animal lover. She has had a life-long passion for food and being in the kitchen is where she is the happiest. Jessica started Delicious Obsessions in 2010 as a way to help share her love for food and cooking. Since then, it has grown into a trusted online resource with a vibrant community of people learning to live healthy, happy lives through real food and natural living.

Discussion

67 comments

  1. Can I use my crock pot for this? It has both a low and a keep warm setting.

    reply 

    sunny
    Posted 04/25/13

    • Hi Sunny – I have not tried it in my crock pot. I found the oven method works well for me, so I’m going to stick with that for now. If you do try the crockpot, you just need to make sure it doesn’t get too hot. I’d try putting some towels in there and then turning it on the warm setting and maybe testing some water to see what the temperature gets to. Let me know how it goes! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 04/25/13

  2. Awww, I love the photo! Your yogurt does look very creamy and thick and delicious! I’m so glad the starter has worked out for you – I feel the same way, so excited to have yogurt again! And I love your method! Great post!

    reply 
    • Hi Starlene – Without you, there would have been no coconut yogurt in my life, so THANK YOU! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 04/25/13

  3. Thanks for this post! Like you, I have Hashi’s and have stayed away from dairy and am on GAPS. I don’t have a yogurt maker or dehydrator, either, but have wanted to do something like this.

    reply 

    Stephanie W.
    Posted 04/25/13

    • Hi Stephanie – I hope it works well for you. You will probably need to tweak it a bit to suit your own oven and tastes, but it’s totally doable! I hope you enjoy. I am seriously addicted! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 04/25/13

      • It worked great! Thank you so much! I’ll miss yogurt no more! :D

        reply 

        Stephanie W.
        Posted 06/01/13

        • Hi Stephanie – So happy to hear it! Enjoy! :)

          reply 

          Jessica
          Posted 06/02/13

  4. Yay! Thanks for this, Jessica! I have been wanting to make yogurt out of coconut milk for so long, and I read a lot of recipes, but they were all rather complicated. Yours is laid out in an easy to follow manner, and I feel confident that I can make my own now. Off now to use the coupon at Cultures for Health! :)

    reply 

    Beth
    Posted 04/25/13

    • Hi Beth – Thanks for stopping by! I hope you enjoy it! Bummer on the starter being out. They sold out quick! Let me know if you have any questions at all :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 04/25/13

  5. Bummer, the vegan direct set starter is out of stock! :(

    reply 

    Beth
    Posted 04/25/13

  6. The recipe turned out perfect!! I just used my usual oven method (without worrying about the thermometer- just bringing to a rolling boil and then letting it cool down until I can comfortably hold my finger in it and then adding the starter)…I used 1/2 tsp Gut Pro powder from E3 Organics…it by the time I checked it at about 17 hours and it was separated so I gave it a shake and let it go for another 12 hours an it remained mixed and had firmed up beautifully!!
    Soooo excited!! Thanks for the great recipe!

    reply 

    Sherry Rothwell
    Posted 05/01/13

    • Hi Sherry – thank you for taking the time to comment! I’m so happy this worked for you! I can’t get enough of it! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 05/02/13

  7. Okay, this question will tell you that I am definitely a beginner! Anyway, for using a Pickl-It! jar with this, you would put in the Plug’R, right? Thank you! I am waiting for another ingredient to arrive, and then I can try this finally!

    reply 

    Stephanie W.
    Posted 05/10/13

  8. ‘Sorry! I’m getting my Pickl-It! parts mixed up. I noticed that you said to put the air lock on. So, anyway, that just gets filled up with water as usual, right? And then when it’s done, do you put the Plug’R in when it goes in the refrigerator? Also, do you leave it the refrigerator for a while (to “set” more or anything) before you eat it? Thank you!

    reply 

    Stephanie W.
    Posted 05/10/13

    • Hi Stephanie – I have used both my Pickl-It jars and my Fido jars for this yogurt and can’t tell a difference between the two. Yes, the airlock will get filled with water. There is typically a “fill line” marked on the airlock that tells you how much water to use. When the yogurt is done, I do use the Plug’R and stick it in the fridge, but you could swap out the lid for a Fido jar lid if you need the PI jar lid for something else. I always let the yogurt cool completely in the fridge before servings. It tastes better, and it thickens up as it sits, depending on how much gelatin you use. Hope that helps and let me know how it goes! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 05/10/13

      • Thank you! I was also wondering…some people use sugar to make their coconut yogurt, but do you feel that the fructans/frucstose are enough food for the cultures? I’m hoping so, because normally I have to be careful about consuming too much coconut oil (or milk). It may be because of the fructans, so I’m hoping the yogurt will be fine if most of that is eaten up.

        reply 

        Stephanie W.
        Posted 05/13/13

        • Also, what is best for sterilizing these jars? If I use dish soap, will any residue be a problem? I was thinking of washing them as I do my other dishes (I don’t use a dishwasher)and then pouring boiling water in the jar. Thanks for your thoughts on this.

          reply 

          Stephanie W.
          Posted 05/13/13

          • Hi Stephanie – I wash my jars and lids in the dishwasher, but I always sanitize them in boiling water before making any ferments. I’d recommend placing the jar, lid, and gasket in a deep pot and filling with cold water. Then, bring to a boil and let boil for 10 minutes or so to sanitize. I don’t pour hot water directly into the jars for fear of cracking them. Hope that helps! :)

            reply 

            Jessica
            Posted 05/13/13

        • Hi Stephanie – Some people insist that adding sugar is required for coconut milk yogurt, but so far, mine is culturing just fine with out it. I prefer to keep the sugar content down on everything I can, so until my batches stop working right, I’ll omit the sugar. I don’t personally know much about fructans, so I can’t speak to that specific issue. Have a great day! :)

          reply 

          Jessica
          Posted 05/13/13

          • Thanks for your help; I appreciate it!

            reply 

            Stephanie W.
            Posted 05/14/13

  9. Another yogurt question – I finally got my starter from Cultures for Health. Their directions for coconut milk yogurt say to use 1 packet (1/8th tsp.) starter for 2 cans of coconut milk. I see that you’re using 1/4 tsp. of the GI Pro Start. Do you think the difference in the amounts comes down to using different starters? I’m wondering if I should use 2 packets of starter. What do you think.. ?

    reply 

    Beth
    Posted 05/17/13

    • Hi Beth – I am sorry for the delay in responding. For some reason, I never saw this comment come in until now. The starter culture is pretty flexible in regards to the amounts used. I played around with different proportions and settled on 1/4 tsp. of the GI. Try playing with it and see what amounts develop a flavor that you like best! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 09/22/13

  10. I do all my yogurt in my electric fry pan. Fill the fry pan with 1/3 – 1/2 water. Add small jars or glasses with yogurt mixture, Set it to stay at around 110 degrees (I use a thermometer), cover and yogurt should be done in 6-8 hours.
    This makes it so simple!

    reply 

    Sandra
    Posted 06/02/13

    • Great tip Sandra! Use what works for you! My mom has an electric frying pan. I may need to borrow and try it! Thanks for stopping by! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 06/03/13

  11. Hi
    I will tell you the easiest way to make normal yogurt which I think will also work with coconut milk yogurt.
    You fill up an empty plastic bottle/milk or juice container with boiling water, then you place it inside a cooling bag or insulated plastic bag (the ones to keep frozeen food from the supermarket to home), then place your fido or mason jar (with your yogurt mixture) also inside the cooling bag. You close the bag and leave it overnight, next morning your yogurt is ready.
    I hope this helps

    reply 

    Nuria
    Posted 06/10/13

    • Great tip Nuria! Thanks for sharing!

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 06/10/13

  12. Why is the pickle it top needed to make yogurt? Can it be made without it? If so do you need to open the container to let any gas out during the time it is being kept warm?

    reply 

    brenda
    Posted 07/09/13

    • Hi Brenda – There is no specific type of jar required to make this yogurt, but since I follow true anaerobic fermentation principles, I only use PIs and Fidos for my fermentation. You could use any jar you would like. This is such a fast ferment, there is no need to let the jar off-gas, as not much pressure builds up. If you’re interested in reading about making yogurt using a variety of jars, this is a great series: http://www.lovingourguts.com/the-great-yogurt-experiment. Have a great day! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 07/10/13

  13. Hi Jessica, your recipe looks so simple and easy, I can’t wait to try it. I’m just wondering – I have an Esiyo yoghurt maker so do I have to heat up the coconut milk? I’m thinking no because the Easiyo instructions just state to mix everything in with normal tap water (their recipe uses powdered milk). I know you don’t use a yoghurt maker but thought I’d see if you have any thoughts.

    reply 

    Karen
    Posted 07/30/13

    • Hi Karen – Thanks for stopping by. I’ve never used a yogurt maker, so I really don’t know. I would follow the instructions that your brand tells you, but I have found yogurt to be pretty forgiving, so it never hurts to experiment. Sorry I can’t be of more help! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 07/30/13

      • Thanks Jessica. I’ll do it as the yoghurt maker says and see what happens. If it doesn’t work, I’ll try it your way. I’ll post back on here to let y’all know how it turned out :)

        reply 

        Karen
        Posted 08/01/13

        • Please do! Your comments are sure to be helpful to others too! :)

          reply 

          Jessica
          Posted 08/01/13

          • Ok so the coconut yoghurt made with your recipe but to the Easiyo yoghurt maker instructions didn’t work. Their instructions were not to heat the milk but rather put it in the yoghurt maker and surround it in boiling hot water. I left it in for 20hrs. The yoghurt was really mild, hardly tasted like yoghurt, and very runny. I used 1tbs of gelatin and 1/2 tsp of non-dairy Inner Health probiotic powder (my son is to have no dairy at all). Not to worry, I’m just using it in smoothies for my son so it’s no biggie. (frozen mango with coconut yoghurt is the bomb!)
            Next time I’ll try more gelatin and probiotics and see what happens!

            reply 

            Karen
            Posted 08/04/13

            • Good to know! I’m sorry the batch didn’t turn out, but happy that it’s not going to waste! I hope the next batch is a little more suitable! :) Thanks for keeping me posted!!

              reply 

              Jessica
              Posted 08/05/13

  14. I’m so confused, maybe this is a silly question, how do you not start a fire putting a towel in the oven? And when you say you “turn the oven on” do you mean you just turn it on and then turn it off, or do you preheat it to 350 first, then put it in the oven and turn it off? sorry if these questions sound silly!

    reply 

    Meg @ Peaches and Cake
    Posted 08/14/13

    • Hi Meg – No worries on the question! There is no fire risk, because you never want the oven to get any hotter than about 100-110 degrees, otherwise, you’ll kill the culture. That’s why I say in the post that you literally only turn your oven on for a few seconds. In my case, I leave my oven on for 40 seconds and then turn it off. Any hotter than that, and you’ll run the chance of ruining your starter culture. That small burst of heat is just enough to get the temperature to a good incubation temp and help the oven hold a warmer temp overnight, but it never gets hot enough to catch your towel on fire. Hope that helps clarify! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 08/14/13

  15. How would you do this w/ a gas oven?
    thanks~

    reply 

    Emily
    Posted 08/19/13

    • You know, Emily, that’s a great question! I have never had a gas oven in any of my homes, so I am uncertain how to answer this. Hopefully another reader will chime in with some ideas! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 08/19/13

  16. Do you have to use yogurt starter or couldn’t you.use some kefir water grains?

    reply 

    Kelly
    Posted 09/10/13

    • Hi Kelly – The bacteria and yeasts in water kefir are completely different from those in yogurts. There are milk kefir grains, which also have different strains of bacteria and yeasts than water kefir grains, that you can use to make coconut milk kefir. From what I have read, water kefir grains do not ferment milks very well, so I have never bothered trying. Have fun experimenting! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 09/12/13

  17. Hi-
    I’d love to try this as I believe my son has a dairy allergy and he loves yogurt. I’m wondering why you chose the GI brand instead of Cultures for Health for your starter. Do you think there is a benefit for the GI one?
    Looking forward to trying this!

    reply 

    margaret
    Posted 09/13/13

    • Hi Margaret – I used the GI one because my friend had sent me quite a bit to play around with. The Cultures For Health one does have more strains in it, so I think it would be a great one to use. As soon as I’m out of what I have, I am going to order the CFH one. I hope you enjoy! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 09/13/13

  18. oh my gosh…i’ve not had yogurt in about 6 years. i miss it!!! thank you for sharing this little bit of coconut heaven! i’m going to gather the goods and give it a go. <3

    reply 

    Heather
    Posted 09/19/13

    • Awesome! I hope you enjoy!! :)

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 09/20/13

  19. Sharing on FB right now – hope you are doing well!

    reply 

    Adrienne @ Whole New Mom
    Posted 10/22/13

    • Thank you for the share Adrienne!

      reply 

      Jessica
      Posted 10/24/13

  20. Is this supposed to still be like liquid when it goes in the fridge??

    reply 

    laura
    Posted 12/13/13

    • Hi Laura – Yes, it will still be rather thin when you take it out of the oven. I let mine continue to cool down to room temp and then move it to the fridge. It will set up once it cools. If you want a thicker yogurt, use more gelatin. Use less for a thinner yogurt. Enjoy! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 12/14/13

  21. Hello!! Thank you for this recipe! What are your feelings on needing to heat the coconut milk to 180 to kill bacteria ? I am about to make my first batch of coconut yogurt and am not sure if it needs to be heated this high like some sites say or not? Thank you, Christine

    reply 

    christine
    Posted 01/17/14

    • Hi Christine – There would be no need to do this. I’m not sure where you are reading that you should, but it is incorrect advice. There’s not going to be bacteria in coconut milk that needs to be killed. Hope that helps!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 01/17/14

      • Hi Jessica!
        Thank you for your quick response. That is what I thought, raw milk is different than canned coconut milk! (although we only gently heated our raw yogurt when we made it) This is the link and I think what I was seeing was this link shared / copied on other sites. http://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/2009/04/25/homemade-coconut-milk-yogurt/ Thank you again! Can’t wait to get a spoon into some non-dairy deliciousness :) Christine

        reply 

        christine
        Posted 01/17/14

        • Hi Christine – Happy to help. I find the thought of “sterilizing” something in order to ferment it kind of an oxymoron. The problem today is that we have too much sterile food, leading to poor digestion and health. I don’t really understand their reasoning for this. I personally don’t recommend sterilizing your food before fermenting. :)

          reply 

          Jessica Espinoza
          Posted 01/21/14

  22. I’ve used the Folding Proofer to make Coconut Milk yogurt. http://brodandtaylor.com/coconut-milk-yogurt-recipe/

    SO Delicious brand dairy free cultured coconut yogurt worked fine.

    The Folding Proofer is great as a yogurt maker because you can set the temperature where you want it and there’s no fussing around with makeshift solutions. It’s kind of expensive as just a yogurt maker (compared to other solutions) but I positively love mine and I use it for bread proofing (rising) too. I’m not sure if I love it more for yogurt or bread.

    reply 

    Amy Bowen
    Posted 01/30/14

    • Hi Amy – Interesting. I’ve never seen that before, but I appreciate you sharing! I learn something new every day. :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 01/30/14

  23. Oh dear, I wonder if this can be done with a yogurt maker. I’ve been looking for coconut milk yogurt recipes that use a yogurt maker, but haven’t found any. I’ve not used the yogurt maker before, so I’m not sure how to tweak things.

    reply 

    Dana Pavuk
    Posted 02/25/14

  24. Will non histamine producing strains like most bifido strains and limited lactobacilli bacteria like l. gasseri, l. salivarius, and L.rhamnosus work?

    reply 

    Robin
    Posted 05/17/14

    • Hi Robin – I’m not sure, but you could certainly give it a try and see. I would do a very small batch to experiment with first. Cheers!

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 05/18/14

  25. Hey Jessica,

    I was wondering if you could help me out as i’m a little new to this! My mum has a yoghurt making machine and I bought some kefir so I thought of making coconut yoghurt with it. Am I right in thinking that all I would need to do is make a coconut milk kefir (just adding the kefir and letting it sit in the coconut milk until it cultures) and then adding normal coconut milk into the yoghurt machine plus the fermented coconut milk?! Or have I made that process up, i’m a little lost and confused!!

    reply 

    Been
    Posted 06/20/14

    • Hi Been – I’m not sure if I’m following you completely, but if you want to make homemade coconut milk kefir, you will need to get some milk kefir grains in order to properly ferment the coconut milk. While store-bought kefir does have some beneficial bacteria in it, it’s not going to be enough to culture a batch of coconut milk. Also, kefir and yogurt are two different products, so I’d recommend doing one or the other. You really don’t need to turn kefir into yogurt. If you want to make coconut milk yogurt, I’d recommend just using my tutorial above. It’s very simple! Hope that clarifies your confusion.

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 06/22/14

  26. Being dairy free for years, I am so excited to try this coconut yogurt! Does it require the starter culture for each batch – or is it possible to use a bit of coconut yogurt from a previous batch as the culture to save on the ongoing costs of purchasing the starter culture? Thank you!

    reply 

    Therese
    Posted 09/02/14

    • Hi Therese – I have never had good success using some of the previous batch to start a new batch. That will work with dairy-based yogurts, but for the coconut milk ones, it does not work well at all. I do end up using new starter culture for each batch. Hope you enjoy! It’s delicious! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 09/04/14

  27. I can’t wait to try this! I am going to give a shot with the coconut milk, though sometimes I find I really don’t like the weird taste that coconut milk has. Does it taste much different from coconut milk right out of the can?

    I am also thinking of trying this recipe with homemade almond milk, which I like the taste of better. I will let you know how everything turns out!

    reply 

    Amy C
    Posted 10/08/14

    • Hi Amy – I think it tastes a little more mild. I have not tried it with the almond milk, but I’d be interested in hearing how it works! :)

      reply 

      Jessica Espinoza
      Posted 10/08/14

  28. thank you, thank you, thank you!! i’ve missed yogurt soo much since going DF. i can find it in the stores, but it’s ridiculously expensive so i’m super-excited to try this :D

    reply 

    Emily
    Posted 10/12/14

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